GoLang: Querying records from Oracle Database using goracle

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Continuing my series of blog posts on using Go Lang with Oracle, in this blog I’ll look at how to setup a query, run the query and parse the query results. I’ll give some examples that include setting up the query as a prepared statement and how to run a query and retrieve the first record returned. Another version of this last example is a query that returns one row.

Check out my previous post on how to create a connection to an Oracle Database.

Let’s start with a simple example. This is the same example from the blog I’ve linked to above, with the Database connection code omitted.

    dbQuery := "select table_name from user_tables where table_name not like 'DM$%' and table_name not like 'ODMR$%'"
    rows, err := db.Query(dbQuery)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(".....Error processing query")
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    defer rows.Close()

    fmt.Println("... Parsing query results") 
    var tableName string
    for rows.Next() {
        rows.Scan(&tableName)
        fmt.Println(tableName)
    }

Processing a query and it’s results involves a number of steps and these are:

  1. Using Query() function to send the query to the database. You could check for errors when processing each row
  2. Iterate over the rows using Next()
  3. Read the columns for each row into variables using Scan(). These need to be defined because Go is strongly typed.
  4. Close the query results using Close(). You might want to defer the use of this function but depends if the query will be reused. The result set will auto close the query after it reaches the last records (in the loop). The Close() is there just in case there is an error and cleanup is needed.

You should never use * as a wildcard in your queries. Always explicitly list the attributes you want returned and only list the attributes you want/need. Never list all attributes unless you are going to use all of them. There can be major query performance benefits with doing this.

Now let us have a look at using prepared statement. With these we can parameterize the query giving us greater flexibility and reuse of the statements. Additionally, these give use better query execution and performance when run the the database as the execution plans can be reused.

    dbQuery, err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = :1")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err) 
        return
    }
    defer dbQuery.Close()

    rows, err := dbQuery.Query('M')
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(".....Error processing query") 
        fmt.Println(err) 
        return
    }
    defer rows.Close()

    var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string
    for rows.Next() {
        rows.Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity)   
        fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity) 
    }

Sometimes you may have queries that return only one row or you only want the first row returned by the query. In cases like this you can reduce the code to something like the following.

var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string
err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = ?").Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity)  
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
} 
fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity)

or an alternative to using Quer(), use QueryRow()

dbQuery, err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = ?")  
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}  
defer dbQuery.Close() 

var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string
err := dbQuery.QueryRow('M').Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity)  
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(".....Error processing query") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}  
fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity)

 

 

 

 

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