Storing and processing Unicode characters in Oracle

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Unicode is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world’s writing systems (Wikipedia). The standard is maintained by the Unicode Consortium, and contains over 137,994 characters (137,766 graphic characters, 163 format characters and 65 control characters).

The NVARCHAR2 is Unicode data type that can store Unicode characters in an Oracle Database. The character set of the NVARCHAR2 is national character set specified at the database creation time. Use the following to determine the national character set for your database.

SELECT *
FROM nls_database_parameters
WHERE PARAMETER = 'NLS_NCHAR_CHARACTERSET';

For my database I’m using an Oracle Autonomous Database. This query returns the character set AL16UTF16. This character set encodes Unicode data in the UTF-16 encoding and uses 2 bytes to store a character.

When creating an attribute with this data type, the size value (max 4000) determines the number of characters allowed. The actual size of the attribute will be double.

Let’s setup some data to test this data type.

CREATE TABLE demo_nvarchar2 (
   attribute_name NVARCHAR2(100));

INSERT INTO demo_nvarchar2 
VALUES ('This is a test for nvarchar2');

The string is 28 characters long. We can use the DUMP function to see the details of what is actually stored.

SELECT attribute_name, DUMP(attribute_name,1016)
FROM demo_nvarchar2;

The DUMP function returns a VARCHAR2 value that contains the datatype code, the length in bytes, and the internal representation of a value.

 

You can see the difference in the storage size of the NVARCHAR2 and the VARCHAR2 attributes.

Valid values for the return_format are 8, 10, 16, 17, 1008, 1010, 1016 and 1017. These values are assigned the following meanings:


8 – octal notation
10 – decimal notation
16 – hexadecimal notation
17 – single characters
1008 – octal notation with the character set name
1010 – decimal notation with the character set name
1016 – hexadecimal notation with the character set name
1017 – single characters with the character set name

The returned value from the DUMP function gives the internal data type representation. The following table lists the various codes and their description.

Code Data Type
1 VARCHAR2(size [BYTE | CHAR])
1 NVARCHAR2(size)
2 NUMBER[(precision [, scale]])
8 LONG
12 DATE
21 BINARY_FLOAT
22 BINARY_DOUBLE
23 RAW(size)
24 LONG RAW
69 ROWID
96 CHAR [(size [BYTE | CHAR])]
96 NCHAR[(size)]
112 CLOB
112 NCLOB
113 BLOB
114 BFILE
180 TIMESTAMP [(fractional_seconds)]
181 TIMESTAMP [(fractional_seconds)] WITH TIME ZONE
182 INTERVAL YEAR [(year_precision)] TO MONTH
183 INTERVAL DAY [(day_precision)] TO SECOND[(fractional_seconds)]
208 UROWID [(size)]
231 TIMESTAMP [(fractional_seconds)] WITH LOCAL TIMEZONE

 

OCI Data Science – Create a Project & Notebook, and Explore the Interface

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In my previous blog post I went through the steps of setting up OCI to allow you to access OCI Data Science. Those steps showed the setup and configuration for your Data Science Team.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.46.42

In this post I will walk through the steps necessary to create an OCI Data Science Project and Notebook, and will then Explore the basic Notebook environment.

1 – Create a Project

From the main menu on the Oracle Cloud home page select Data Science -> Projects from the menu.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.07.19

Select the appropriate Compartment in the drop-down list on the left hand side of the screen. In my previous blog post I created a separate Compartment for my Data Science work and team. Then click on the Create Projects button.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.09.11Enter a name for your project. I called this project, ‘DS-Demo-Project’. Click Create button.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.13.44

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.14.44

That’s the Project created.

2 – Create a Notebook

After creating a project (see above) you can not create one or many Notebook Sessions.

To create a Notebook Session click on the Create Notebook Session button (see the above image).  This will create a VM to contain your notebook and associated work. Just like all VM in Oracle Cloud, they come in various different shapes. These can be adjusted at a later time to scale up and then back down based on the work you will be performing.

The following example creates a Notebook Session using the basic VM shape. I call the Notebook ‘DS-Demo-Notebook’. I also set the Block Storage size to 50G, which is the minimum value. The VNC details have been defaulted to those assigned to the Compartment. Click Create button at the bottom of the page.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.22.24

The Notebook Session VM will be created. This might take a few minutes. When created you will see a screen like the following.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.31.21

3 – Open the Notebook

After completing the above steps you can now open the Notebook Session in your browser.  Either click on the Open button (see above image), or copy the link and share with your data science team.

Important: There are a few important considerations when using the Notebooks. While the session is running you will be paying for it, even if the session got terminated at the browser or you lost connect. To manage costs, you may need to stop the Notebook session. More details on this in a later post.

After clicking on the Open button, a new browser tab will open and will ask you to log-in.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.35.26

After logging in you will see your Notebook.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.37.42

4 – Explore the Notebook Environment

The Notebook comes pre-loaded with lots of goodies.

The menu on the left-hand side provides a directory with lots of sample Notebooks, access to the block storage and a sample getting started Notebook.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.41.09

When you are ready to create your own Notebook you can click on the icon for that.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.42.50

Or if you already have a Notebook, created elsewhere, you can load that into your OCI Data Science environment.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.44.50

The uploaded Notebook will appear in the list on the left-hand side of the screen.

OCI Data Science – Initial Setup and Configuration

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After a very, very, very long wait (18+ months) Oracle OCI Data Science platform is now available.

But before you jump straight into using OCI Data Science, there is a little bit of setup required for your Cloud Tenancy. There is the easy simple approach and then there is the slightly more involved approach. These are

  • Simple approach. Assuming you are just going to use the root tenancy and compartment, you just need to setup a new policy to enable the use of the OCI Data Science services. This assuming you have your VNC configuration complete with NAT etc. This can be done by creating a policy with the following policy statement. After creating this you can proceed with creating your first notebook in OCI Data Science.
allow service datascience to use virtual-network-family in tenancy

Screenshot 2020-02-11 19.46.38

  • Slightly more complicated approach. When you get into having a team based approach you will need to create some additional Oracle Cloud components to manage them and what resources are allocated to them. This involved creating Compartments, allocating users, VNCs, Policies etc. The following instructions brings you through these steps

IMPORTANT: After creating a Compartment or some of the other things listed below, and they are not displayed in the expected drop-down lists etc, then either refresh your screen or log-out and log back in again!

1. Create a Group for your Data Science Team & Add Users

The first step involves creating a Group to ‘group’ the various users who will be using the OCI Data Science services.

Go to Governance and Administration ->Identity and click on Groups.

Enter some basic descriptive information. I called my Group, ‘my-data-scientists’.

Now click on your Group in the list of Groups and add the users to the group.

You may need to create the accounts for the various users.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 12.03.58

2. Create a Compartment for your Data Science work

Now create a new Compartment to own the network resources and the Data Science resources.

Go to Governance and Administration ->Identity and click on Compartments.

Enter some basic descriptive information. I’ve called my compartment, ‘My-DS-Compartment’.

3. Create Network for your Data Science work

Creating and setting up the VNC can be a little bit of fun. You can do it the manual way whereby you setup and configure everything. Or you can use the wizard to do this. I;m going to show the wizard approach below.

But the first thing you need to do is to select the Compartment the VNC will belong to. Select this from the drop-down list on the left hand side of the Virtual Cloud Network page. If your compartment is not listed, then log-out and log-in!

To use the wizard approach click the Networking QuickStart button.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.15.28

Select the option ‘VCN with Internet Connectivity and click Start Workflow, as you will want to connect to it and to allow the service to connect to other cloud services.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.17.22

I called my VNC ‘My-DS-vnc’ and took the default settings. Then click the Next button.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.19.31

The next screen shows a summary of what will be done. Click the Create button, and all of these networking components will be created.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.22.39

All done with creating the VNC.

4. Create required Policies enable OCI Data Science for your Compartment

There are three policies needed to allocated the necessary resources to the various components we have just created. To create these go to Governance and Administration ->Identity and click on Policies.

Select your Compartment from the drop-down list. This should be ‘My-DS-Compartment’, then click on Create Policy.

The first policy allocates a group to a compartment for the Data Science services. I called this policy, ‘DS-Manage-Access’.

allow group My-data-scientists to manage data-science-family in compartment My-DS-Compartment

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.30.10

The next policy is to give the Data Science users access to the network resources. I called this policy, ‘DS-Manage-Network’.

allow group My-data-scientists to use virtual-network-family in compartment My-DS-Compartment

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.37.47

And the third policy is to give Data Science service access to the network resources. I called this policy, ‘DS-Network-Access’.

allow service datascience to use virtual-network-family in compartment My-DS-Compartment

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.41.01

Job Done 🙂

You are now setup to run the OCI Data Science service.  Check out my Blog Post on creating your first OCI Data Science Notebook and exploring what is available in this Notebook.

Data Science (The MIT Press Essential Knowledge series) – available in English, Korean and Chinese

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Back in the middle of 2018 MIT Press published my Data Science book, co-written with John Kelleher. It book was published as part of their Essentials Series.

During the few months it was available in 2018 it became a best seller on Amazon, and one of the top best selling books for MIT Press. This happened again in 2019. Yes, two years running it has been a best seller!

2020 kicks off with the book being translated into Korean and Chinese. Here are the covers of these translated books.

The Japanese and Turkish translations will be available in a few months!

Go get the English version of the book on Amazon in print, Kindle and Audio formats.

https://amzn.to/2qC84KN

This book gives a concise introduction to the emerging field of data science, explaining its evolution, relation to machine learning, current uses, data infrastructure issues and ethical challenge the goal of data science is to improve decision making through the analysis of data. Today data science determines the ads we see online, the books and movies that are recommended to us online, which emails are filtered into our spam folders, even how much we pay for health insurance.

Go check it out.

Amazon.com.          Amazon.co.uk

Screenshot 2020-02-05 11.46.03

Scottish Whisky Data Set – Updated

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The Scottish Whiskey data set consist of tasting notes and evaluations from 86 distilleries around Scotland. This data set has been around a long time andwas a promotional site for a book, Whisky Classified: Choosing Single Malts by Flavour. Written by David Wishart of the University of Saint Andrews, the book had its most recent printing in February 2012.

I’ve been using this data set in one of my conference presentations (Planning my Summer Vacation), but to use this data set I need to add 2 new attributes/features to the data set. Each of the attributes are listed below and the last 2 are the attributes I added. These were added to include the converted LAT and LONG comparable with Google Maps and other similar mapping technology.

Attributes include:

  • RowID
  • Distillery
  • Body
  • Sweetness
  • Smoky
  • Medicinal
  • Tobacco
  • Honey
  • Spicy
  • Winey
  • Nutty,
  • Malty,
  • Fruity,
  • Floral,
  • Postcode,
  • Latitude,
  • Longitude
  • lat  — newly added
  • long  — newly added

Here is the link to download and use this updated Scottish Whisky data set.

The original website is no longer available but if you have a look at the Internet Archive you will find the website.

Screenshot 2020-01-23 14.44.53

Python-Connecting to multiple Oracle Autonomous DBs in one program

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More and more people are using the FREE Oracle Autonomous Database for building new new applications, or are migrating to it.

I’ve previously written about connecting to an Oracle Database using Python. Check out that post for details of how to setup Oracle Client and the Oracle Python library cx_Oracle.

In thatblog post I gave examples of connecting to an Oracle Database using the HostName (or IP address), the Service Name or the SID.

But with the Autonomous Oracle Database things are a little bit different. With the Autonomous Oracle Database (ADW or ATP) you will need to use an Oracle Wallet file. This file contains some of the connection details, but you don’t have access to ServiceName/SID, HostName, etc.  Instead you have the name of the Autonomous Database. The Wallet is used to create a secure connection to the Autonomous Database.

You can download the Wallet file from the Database console on Oracle Cloud.

Screenshot 2020-01-10 12.24.10

Most people end up working with multiple database. Sometimes these can be combined into one TNSNAMES file. This can make things simple and easy. To use the download TNSNAME file you will need to set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable. This will allow Python and cx_Oracle library to automatically pick up this file and you can connect to the ATP/ADW Database.

But most people don’t work with just a single database or use a single TNSNAMES file. In most cases you need to switch between different database connections and hence need to use multiple TNSNAMES files.

The question is how can you switch between ATP/ADW Database using different TNSNAMES files while inside one Python program?

Use the os.environ setting in Python. This allows you to reassign the TNS_ADMIN environment variable to point to a new directory containing the TNSNAMES file. This is a temporary assignment and over rides the TNS_ADMIN environment variable.

For example,

import cx_Oracle
import os

os.environ['TNS_ADMIN'] = "/Users/brendan.tierney/Dropbox/wallet_ATP"

p_username = ''p_password = ''p_service = 'atp_high'
con = cx_Oracle.connect(p_username, p_password, p_service)

print(con)
print(con.version)
con.close()

I can now easily switch to another ATP/ADW Database, in the same Python program, by changing the value of os.environ and opening a new connection.

import cx_Oracle
import os

os.environ['TNS_ADMIN'] = "/Users/brendan.tierney/Dropbox/wallet_ATP"
p_username = ''
p_password = ''
p_service = 'atp_high'
con1 = cx_Oracle.connect(p_username, p_password, p_service)
...
con1.close()

...
os.environ['TNS_ADMIN'] = "/Users/brendan.tierney/Dropbox/wallet_ADW2"
p_username = ''
p_password = ''
p_service = 'ADW2_high'
con2 = cx_Oracle.connect(p_username, p_password, p_service)
...
con2.close()

As mentioned previously the setting and resetting of TNS_ADMIN using os.environ, is only temporary, and when your Python program exists or completes the original value for this environment variable will remain.

#GE2020 Comparing Party Manifestos to 2016

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A few days ago I wrote a blog post about using Python to analyze the 2016 general (government) elections manifestos of the four main political parties in Ireland.

Today the two (traditional) largest parties released their #GE2020 manifestos. You can get them by following these links

The following images show the WordClouds generated for the #GE2020 Manifestos. I used the same Python code used in my previous post. If you want to try this out yourself, all the Python code is there.

First let us look at the WordClouds from Fine Gael.

FG2020
2020 Manifesto
FG_2016
2016 Manifesto

Now for the Fianna Fail WordClouds.

FF2020
2020 Manifesto
FF_2016
2016 Manifesto

When you look closely at the differences between the manifestos you will notice there are some common themes across the manifestos from 2016 to those in the 2020 manifestos. It is also interesting to see some new words appearing/disappearing for the 2020 manifestos. Some of these are a little surprising and interesting.