database

Working with External Data on Oracle DB Docker

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With multi-modal databases (such as Oracle and many more) you will typically work with data in different formats and for different purposes. One such data format is with data located external to the database. The data will exist in files on the operating systems on the DB server or on some connected storage device.

The following demonstrates how to move data to an Oracle Database Docker image and access this data using External Tables. (This based on an example from Oracle-base.com with a few additional commands).

For this example, I’ll be using an Oracle 21c Docker image setup previously. Similarly the same steps can be followed for the 18c XE Docker image, by changing the Contain Id from 21cFull to 18XE.

Step 1 – Connect to OS in the Docker Container & Create Directory

The first step involves connecting the the OS of the container. As the container is setup for default user ‘oracle’, that is who we will connect as, and it is this Linux user who owns all the Oracle installation and associated files and directories

docker exec -it 21cFull /bin/bash

When connected we are in the Home directory for the Oracle user.

The Home directory contains lots of directories which contain all the files necessary for running the Oracle Database.

Next we need to create a directory which will story the files.

mkdir ext_data

As we are logged in as the oracle Linux user, we don’t have to make any permissions changes, as Oracle Database requires read and write access to this directory.

Step 3 – Upload files to Directory on Docker container

Open another terminal window on your computer (desktop/laptop). You should have two such terminal windows open. One you opened for Step 1 above, and this one. This will allow you to easily switch between files on your computer and the files in the Docker container.

Download the two Countries files, to your computer, which are listed on Oracle-base.com. Countries1.txt and Countries2.txt.

Now you need to upload those files to the Docker container.

docker cp Countries1.txt 21cFull:/opt/oracle/ext_data/Countries1.txt
docker cp Countries2.txt 21cFull:/opt/oracle/ext_data/Countries2.txt

Step 4 – Connect to System (DBA) schema, Create User, Create Directory, Grant access to Directory

If you a new to the Database container, you don’t have any general users/schemas created. You should create one, as you shouldn’t use the System (or DBA) user for any development work. To create a new database user connect to System.

sqlplus system/SysPassword1@//localhost/XEPDB1

To use sqlplus command line tool you will need to install Oracle Instant Client and then SQLPlus (which is a separate download from the same directory for your OS)

To create a new user/schema in the database you can run the following (change the username and password to something more sensible).

create user brendan identified by BtPassword1
default tablespace users
temporary tablespace temp;
grant connect, resource to brendan;
alter user brendan
quota unlimited on users;

Now create the Directory object in the database, which points to the directory on the Docker OS we created in the Step 1 above. Grant ‘brendan’ user/schema read and write access to this Directory

CREATE OR REPLACE DIRECTORY ext_tab_data AS '/opt/oracle/ext_data';
grant read, write on directory ext_tab_data to brendan;

Now, connect to the brendan user/schema.

Step 5 – Create external table and test

To connect to brendan user/schema, you can run the following if you are still using SQLPlus

SQL> connect brendan/BtPassword1@//localhost/XEPDB1

or if you exited it, just run this from the command line

sqlplus system/SysPassword1@//localhost/XEPDB1

Create the External Table (same code from oracle-base.com)

CREATE TABLE countries_ext (
  country_code      VARCHAR2(5),
  country_name      VARCHAR2(50),
  country_language  VARCHAR2(50)
)
ORGANIZATION EXTERNAL (
  TYPE ORACLE_LOADER
  DEFAULT DIRECTORY ext_tab_data
  ACCESS PARAMETERS (
    RECORDS DELIMITED BY NEWLINE
    FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
    MISSING FIELD VALUES ARE NULL
    (
      country_code      CHAR(5),
      country_name      CHAR(50),
      country_language  CHAR(50)
    )
  )
  LOCATION ('Countries1.txt','Countries2.txt')
)
PARALLEL 5
REJECT LIMIT UNLIMITED;

It should create for you. If not and you get an error then if will be down to a typo on directory name or the files are not in the directory or something like that.

We can now query the External Table as if it is a Table in the database.

SQL> set linesize 120
SQL> select * from countries_ext order by country_name;
COUNT COUNTRY_NAME                         COUNTRY_LANGUAGE
----- ------------------------------------ ------------------------------
ENG   England                              English
FRA   France                               French
GER   Germany                              German
IRE   Ireland                              English
SCO   Scotland                             English
USA   Unites States of America             English
WAL   Wales                                Welsh

7 rows selected.

All done!

Oracle 21c XE Database and Docker setup

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You know when you are waiting for the 39 bus for ages, and then two of them turn up at the same time. It’s a bit like this with Oracle 21c XE Database Docker image being released a few days after the 18XE Docker image!

Again we have Gerald Venzi to thank for putting these together and making them available.

If you want to install Oracle 21c XE yourself then go to the download page and within a few minutes you are ready to go. Remember 21c XE is a fully featured version of their main Enterprise Database, with a few limitations, basically on size of deployment. You’d be surprised how many organisations who’s data would easily fit within these limitations/restrictions. The resource limits of Oracle Database 21 XE include:

  • 2 CPU threads
  • 2 GB of RAM
  • 12GB of user data (Compression is included so you can store way way more than 12G)
  • 3 pluggable Databases

Remember the 39 bus scenario I mentioned above. A couple of weeks ago the Oracle 18c XE Docker image was released. This is a full installation of the database and all you need to do is to download it and run it. Nothing else is required. Check out my previous post on this.

To download, install and run Oracle 21c XE Docker image, just run the following commands.

docker pull gvenzl/oracle-xe:21-full

docker run -d -p 1521:1521 -e ORACLE_PASSWORD=SysPassword1 -v oracle-volume:/opt/oracle/XE21CFULL/oradata gvenzl/oracle-xe:21-full

docker rename da37a77bb436 21cFull

sqlplus system/SysPassword1@//localhost/XEPDB1

Then to stop the image from running and to restart it, just run the following

docker stop 21cFull
docker start 21cFull

Check out my previous post on Oracle 18c XE setup for a few more commands.

Exploring Database trends using Python pytrends (Google Trends)

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A little word of warning before you read the rest of this post. The examples shown below are just examples of what is possible. It isn’t very scientific or rigorous, so don’t come complaining if what is shown doesn’t match your knowledge and other insights. This is just a little fun to see what is possible. Yes a more rigorous scientific study is needed, and some attempts at this can be seen at DB-Engines.com. Less scientific are examples shown at TOPDB Top Database index and that isn’t meant to be very scientific.

After all of that, here we go πŸ™‚

pytrends is a library providing an API to Google Trends using Python. The following examples show some ways you can use this library and the focus area I’ll be using is Databases. Many of you are already familiar with using Google Trends, and if this isn’t something you have looked at before then I’d encourage you to go have a look at their website and to give it a try. You don’t need to run Python to use it. For example, here is a quick example taken from the Google Trends website. Here are a couple of screen shots from Google Trends, comparing Relational Database to NoSQL Database. The information presented is based on what searches have been performed over the past 12 months. Some of the information is kind of interesting when you look at the related queries and also the distribution of countries.

To install pytrends use the pip command

pip3 install pytrends

As usual it will change the various pendent libraries and will update where necessary. In my particular case, the only library it updated was the version of pandas.

You do need to be careful of how many searches you perform as you may be limited due to Google rate limits. You can get around this by using a proxy and there is an example on the pytrends PyPi website on how to get around this.

The following code illustrates how to import and setup an initial request. The pandas library is also loaded as the data returned by pytrends API into a pandas dataframe. This will make it ease to format and explore the data.

import pandas as pd 
from pytrends.request import TrendReq

pytrends = TrendReq()

The pytrends API has about nine methods. For my example I’ll be using the following:

  • Interest Over Time: returns historical, indexed data for when the keyword was searched most as shown on Google Trends’ Interest Over Time section.
  • Interest by Region: returns data for where the keyword is most searched as shown on Google Trends’ Interest by Region section.
  • Related Queries: returns data for the related keywords to a provided keyword shown on Google Trends’ Related Queries section.
  • Suggestions: returns a list of additional suggested keywords that can be used to refine a trend search.

Let’s now explore these APIs using the Databases as the main topic of investigation and examining some of the different products. I’ve used the db-engines.com website to select the top 5 databases (as per date of this blog post). These were:

  • Oracle
  • MySQL
  • SQL Server
  • PostgreSQL
  • MongoDB

I will use this list to look for number of searches and other related information. First thing is to import the necessary libraries and create the connection to Google Trends.

import pandas as pd 
from pytrends.request import TrendReq

pytrends = TrendReq()

Next setup the payload and keep the timeframe for searches to the past 12 months only.

search_list = ["Oracle", "MySQL", "SQL Server", "PostgreSQL", "MongoDB"] #max of 5 values allowed
pytrends.build_payload(search_list, timeframe='today 12-m')

We can now look at the the interest over time method to see the number of searches, based on a ranking where 100 is the most popular.

df_ot = pd.DataFrame(pytrends.interest_over_time()).drop(columns='isPartial')
df_ot

and to see a breakdown of these number on an hourly bases you can use the get_historical_interest method.

pytrends.get_historical_interest(search_list)

Let’s move on to exploring the level of interest/searches by country. The following retrieves this information, ordered by Oracle (in decending order) and then select the top 20 countries. Here we can see the relative number of searches per country. Note these doe not necessarily related to the countries with the largest number of searches

df_ibr = pytrends.interest_by_region(resolution='COUNTRY') # CITY, COUNTRY or REGION
df_ibr.sort_values('Oracle', ascending=False).head(20)

Visualizing data is always a good thing to do as we can see a patterns and differences in the data in a clearer way. The following takes the above query and creates a stacked bar chart.

import matplotlib
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

df2 = df_ibr.sort_values('Oracle', ascending=False).head(20)

df2.reset_index().plot(x='geoName', y=['Oracle', 'MySQL', 'SQL Server', 'PostgreSQL', 'MongoDB'], kind ='bar', stacked=True, title="Searches by Country")

plt.rcParams["figure.figsize"] = [20, 8]
plt.xlabel("Country")
plt.ylabel("Ranking")

We can delve into the data more, by focusing on one particular country and examine the google searches by city or region. The following looks at the data from USA and gives the rankings for the various states.

pytrends.build_payload(search_list, geo='US')
df_ibr = pytrends.interest_by_region(resolution='COUNTRY', inc_low_vol=True)
df_ibr.sort_values('Oracle', ascending=False).head(20)

df2.reset_index().plot(x='geoName', y=['Oracle', 'MySQL', 'SQL Server', 'PostgreSQL', 'MongoDB'], kind ='bar', stacked=True, title="test")
plt.rcParams["figure.figsize"] = [20, 8]

plt.title("Searches for USA")
plt.xlabel("State")
plt.ylabel("Ranking")

 

We can find the top related queries and and top queries including the names of each database.

search_list = ["Oracle", "MySQL", "SQL Server", "PostgreSQL", "MongoDB"] #max of 5 values allowed
pytrends.build_payload(search_list, timeframe='today 12-m')

rq = pytrends.related_queries()
rq.values()

#display rising terms
rq.get('Oracle').get('rising')

We can see the top related rising queries for Oracle are about tik tok. No real surprise there!

and the top queries for Oracle included:

rq.get('Oracle').get('top')

This was an interesting exercise to do. I didn’t show all the results, but when you explore the other databases in the list and see the results from those, and then compare them across the five databases you get to see some interesting patterns.

 

Changing PDB/CDB spfile parameters

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When working with a Oracle database hosted on the Oracle cloud (not an Autonomous DB), I recently had the need to change/increase the number of processes for the database. After a bit of researching it looked liked I just had to make the change to the SPFILE and that would be it.

I needed to change/increase the PROCESSES parameter for the CDB and the PDB. Following the multitude of advice on the internet, I ssh into the DB server, found the SPFILE and changed it.

I bounced the DB and when I connected to the PDB, I found the number for PROCESSES was still the same as the old/original value. Nothing had changed.

By default the initialization parameter for the PDB inherit the values from the parameters for the CDB. But this didn’t seem to be the case.

After a bit more research, I needed to set this parameter for the CDB and the PDB. But no luck finding a parameter file for the PDB. It turns out the parameters for the PDB are set at the metadata level, and I needed to change the parameter there.

What I had to do was to change the value when connected to it using SQL*Plus, SQL Dev etc.Β  So, How did I change the parameter value.

Using SQL Developer as my tool, I connected as SYSDBA to my PDB. Then ran,

alter session set container = cdb$root

Now change the parameter value.

alter system set processes = 1200 scope=both

I then bounced the database, logged back into my PDB as system and checked the parameter values. It worked. This was such a simple solution and it worked for me, but there was way too many articles, blog posts, etc out there that didn’t work. Something I’ll need to investigate later is, did I need to connect to the CDB? could I have just run the second command only?Β  I need to setup a different/test DB and see.

 

GoLang: Inserting records into Oracle Database using goracle

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In this blog post I’ll give some examples of how to process data for inserting into a table in an Oracle Database. I’ve had some previous blog posts on how to setup and connecting to an Oracle Database, and another on retrieving data from an Oracle Database and the importance of setting the Array Fetch Size.

When manipulating data the statements can be grouped (generally) into creating new data and updating existing data.

When working with this kind of processing we need to avoid the creation of the statements as a concatenation of strings. This opens the possibility of SQL injection, plus we are not allowing the optimizer in the database to do it’s thing. Prepared statements allows for the reuse of execution plans and this in turn can speed up our data processing and applications.

In a previous blog post I gave a simple example of a prepared statement for querying data and then using it to pass in different values as a parameter to this statement.

dbQuery, err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = :1")  
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}  
defer dbQuery.Close() 

rows, err := dbQuery.Query('M')  
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(".....Error processing query") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}  
defer rows.Close()  

var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string 
for rows.Next() {  
    rows.Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity) 
    fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity)  
}

For prepared statements for inserting data we can follow a similar structure. In the following example a table call LAST_CONTACT is used. This table has columns:

  • CUST_ID
  • CON_METHOD
  • CON_MESSAGE
_, err := db.Exec("insert into LAST_CONTACT(cust_id, con_method, con_message) VALUES(:1, :2, :3)", 1, "Phone", "First contact with customer")
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(".....Error Inserting data") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return
}

an alternative is the following and allows us to get some additional information about what was done and the result from it. In this example we can get the number records processed.

stmt, err := db.Prepare("insert into LAST_CONTACT(cust_id, con_method, con_message) VALUES(:1, :2, :3)") 
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return 
}

res, err := dbQuery.Query(1, "Phone", "First contact with customer")  
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(".....Error Inserting data") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
} 

rowCnt := res.RowsAffected()
fmt.Println(rowCnt, " rows inserted.")

A similar approach can be taken for updating and deleting records

Managing Transactions

With transaction, a number of statements needs to be processed as a unit. For example, in double entry book keeping we have two inserts. One Credit insert and one debit insert. To do this we can define the start of a transaction using db.Begin() and the end of the transaction with a Commit(). Here is an example were we insert two contact details.

// start the transaction
transx, err := db.Begin()
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}

// Insert first record
_, err := db.Exec("insert into LAST_CONTACT(cust_id, con_method, con_message) VALUES(:1, :2, :3)", 1, "Email", "First Email with customer") 
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(".....Error Inserting data - first statement") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return 
}
// Insert second record
_, err := db.Exec("insert into LAST_CONTACT(cust_id, con_method, con_message) VALUES(:1, :2, :3)", 1, "In-Person", "First In-Person with customer") 
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(".....Error Inserting data - second statement") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return 
}

// complete the transaction
err = transx.Commit()
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(".....Error Committing Transaction") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return 
}

 

GoLang: Querying records from Oracle Database using goracle

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Continuing my series of blog posts on using Go Lang with Oracle, in this blog I’ll look at how to setup a query, run the query and parse the query results. I’ll give some examples that include setting up the query as a prepared statement and how to run a query and retrieve the first record returned. Another version of this last example is a query that returns one row.

Check out my previous post on how to create a connection to an Oracle Database.

Let’s start with a simple example. This is the same example from the blog I’ve linked to above, with the Database connection code omitted.

    dbQuery := "select table_name from user_tables where table_name not like 'DM$%' and table_name not like 'ODMR$%'"
    rows, err := db.Query(dbQuery)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(".....Error processing query")
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    defer rows.Close()

    fmt.Println("... Parsing query results") 
    var tableName string
    for rows.Next() {
        rows.Scan(&tableName)
        fmt.Println(tableName)
    }

Processing a query and it’s results involves a number of steps and these are:

  1. Using Query() function to send the query to the database. You could check for errors when processing each row
  2. Iterate over the rows using Next()
  3. Read the columns for each row into variables using Scan(). These need to be defined because Go is strongly typed.
  4. Close the query results using Close(). You might want to defer the use of this function but depends if the query will be reused. The result set will auto close the query after it reaches the last records (in the loop). The Close() is there just in case there is an error and cleanup is needed.

You should never use * as a wildcard in your queries. Always explicitly list the attributes you want returned and only list the attributes you want/need. Never list all attributes unless you are going to use all of them. There can be major query performance benefits with doing this.

Now let us have a look at using prepared statement. With these we can parameterize the query giving us greater flexibility and reuse of the statements. Additionally, these give use better query execution and performance when run the the database as the execution plans can be reused.

    dbQuery, err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = :1")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err) 
        return
    }
    defer dbQuery.Close()

    rows, err := dbQuery.Query('M')
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(".....Error processing query") 
        fmt.Println(err) 
        return
    }
    defer rows.Close()

    var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string
    for rows.Next() {
        rows.Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity)   
        fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity) 
    }

Sometimes you may have queries that return only one row or you only want the first row returned by the query. In cases like this you can reduce the code to something like the following.

var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string
err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = ?").Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity)  
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
} 
fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity)

or an alternative to using Quer(), use QueryRow()

dbQuery, err := db.Prepare("select cust_first_name, cust_last_name, cust_city from sh.customers where cust_gender = ?")  
if err != nil {
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}  
defer dbQuery.Close() 

var CustFname, CustSname,CustCity string
err := dbQuery.QueryRow('M').Scan(&CustFname, &CustSname, &CustCity)  
if err != nil { 
    fmt.Println(".....Error processing query") 
    fmt.Println(err) 
    return  
}  
fmt.Println(CustFname, CustSname, CustCity)

 

 

 

 

18c is now available (but only on the Cloud)

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On Friday afternoon (16th February) we started to see tweets and blog posts from people in Oracle saying that Oracle 18c was now available. But is only available on Oracle Cloud and Engineered Systems.

It looks like we will have to wait until the Autumn before we can install it ourselves on our own servers 😦

Here is the link to the official announcement for Oracle 18c.

Oracle 18c is really Oracle 12.2.0.2. The next full new release of the Oracle database is expected to be Oracle 19.

The new features and incremental enhancements in Oracle 18c are:

  • Multitenant
  • In-Memory
  • Sharding
  • Memory Optimized Fetches
  • Exadata RAC Optimizations
  • High Availability
  • Security
  • Online Partition Merge
  • Improved Machine Learning (OAA)
  • Polymorphic Table Functions
  • Spatial and Graph
  • More JSON improvements
  • Private Temporary Tablespaces
  • New mode for Connection Manager

And now the all important links to the documentation.

Oracle 18c Documentation

Oracle 18c New Features

Oracle 18c Data Warehousing

To give Oracle 18c a try you will need to go to cloud.oracle.com and select Database from the drop down list from the Platform menu. Yes you are going to need an Oracle Cloud account and some money or some free credit. Go and get some free cloud credits at the upcoming Oracle Code events.

If you want a ‘free’ way of trying out Oracle 18c, you can use Oracle Live SQL. They have setup some examples of the new features for you to try.

NewImage

NOTE: Oracle 18c is not Autonomous. Check out Tim Hall’s blog posts about this. The Autonomous Oracle Database is something different, and we will be hearing more about this going forward.

12.2 DBaaS (Extreme Edition) possible bug/issue with the DB install/setup

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A few weeks ago the 12.2 Oracle Database was released on the cloud. I immediately set an account and got my 12.2 DBaaS setup. This was a relatively painless process and quick.

For me I wanted to test out all the new Oracle Advanced Analytics new features and the new features in SQL Developer 4.2 that only become visible when you are using the 12.2 Database.

When you are go to use the Oracle Data Miner (GUI tool) in SQL Developer 4.2, it will check to see if the ODMr repository is installed in the database. If it isn’t then you will be promoted for the SYS password.

This is the problem. In previous version of the DBaaS (12.1, etc) this was not an issue.

When you go to create your DBaaS you are asked for a password that will be used for the admin accounts of the database.

But when I entered the password for SYS, I got an error saying invalid password.

After using ssh to create a terminal connection to the DBaaS I was able to to connect to the container using

sqlplus / as sysdba

and also using

sqlplus sys/ as sysdba

Those worked fine. But when I tried to connect to the PDB1 I got the invalid username and/or password error.

sqlplus sys/@pdb1 as sysdba

I reconnected as follows

sqlplus / as sysdba

and then changed the password for SYS with containers=all

This command completed without errors but when I tried using the new password to connect the the PDB1 I got the same error.

After 2 weeks working with Oracle Support they eventually pointed me to the issue of the password file for the PDB1 was missing. They claim this is due to an error when I was creating/installing the database.

But this was a DBaaS and I didn’t install the database. This is a problem with how Oracle have configured the installation.

The answer was to create a password file for the PDB1 using the following

Installing Oracle 12.1.0.2 on Windows 64bit

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The following steps are what I did for installing 12.1.0.2 on Windows.

1. Download the Oracle installation ZIP files from the Oracle Downloads page.

DB Install 15

2. Unzip the two 12c downloads files into the same directory.

3. Go to the newly created directory (it is probably called ‘database’) and you will find a file called setup.exe. Double click on this file.

DB Install 1

After a couple of seconds you will see the Oracle Database 12c splash screen.

DB Install 2

4. Step 1 : Configure Security Updates : Un-tick the tick-box and click the Next button. A warning message will appear. You can click on the Yes button to proceed.

DB Install 3

5. Step 2 : Installation Options : select the Create and Configure a Database option and then click the Next button.

DB Install 4

6. Step 3 : System Class : Select the Server Class option and then click the Next button.

DB Install 5

7. Step 4 : Grid Installation Options : Select the Single Instance Database Installation option and then click the next button.

DB Install 6

8. Step 5 : Select Install Type : Select the Typical install option and then click the Next button.

DB Install 7

9. Step 6 : Oracle Home User Selection : Select the Use Windows Built-in Account option and then click the Next button. A warning message appears. Click the Yes button.

DB Install 8

10. Step 7 : Typical Install Configuration : Set Global Database Name to cdb12c for the container database name. Set the Administrative password for the container database. Set the name of the pluggable database that will be created. Set this to pdb12c. Or you can accept the default names. Then click the Next button. If you get a warning message saying the password does not conform to the recommended standards, you can click the Yes button to ignore this warning and proceed.

DB Install 9

11. Step 8 : Prerequisite Checks : the install will check to see that you have enough space and necessary permissions etc.

12. Step 9 : Summary : When the prerequisite checks (like checking you have enough space and privileges) are finished you will get a window like the following.

DB Install 10

13. Step 10 : Install : You are now ready to start the install process. To do this click on the Install button in the Summary screen.

DB Install 11

You can now sit back, relax and watch the installation of 12.1.0.2c (with the in-memory option) complete.

You may get some Windows Security Alert windows pop up. Just click on the Allow Access button.

Then the Database Configuration Assistant will start. This step might take a while to complete.

DB Install 12

When everything is done you will get something like the following.

DB Install 13

Congratulations you now have Oracle Database 12.1.0.2c installed.

But you are not finished yet!!!

14. Add entry to TNSNAMES.ORA : you will need to add an entry to your tnsnames.ora file for the pluggable database. There is be an entry for the container DB but not for the pluggable. Here is what I added to my tnsnames.ora.

DB Install 14

The last step you need to do is to tell the container database to start up the pluggables when you reboot the server/laptop/PC/VM. To do this you will need to create the following trigger in the container DB.

sqlplus / as sysdba

CREATE or REPLACE trigger OPEN_ALL_PLUGGABLES

Β Β Β  after startup

Β Β Β  on database

BEGIN

Β Β Β  execute immediate ‘alter pluggable database all open’;

END open_all_pdbs;

Restart your database or machine and you plug gage DB ‘pdb12c’ will no automatically start.

You are all finished now πŸ™‚

Enjoy πŸ™‚

Oracle Advanced Analytics and Oracle Fusion Apps

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At a recent Oracle User Group conference, I was part of a round table discussion on Apps and BI. Unfortunately most of the questions were focused on Apps and the new Fusion Applications from Oracle. I mentioned that there was data mining functionality (using the Oracle Advanced Analytics Option) built into the Fusion Apps, it seems to come as a surprise to the Apps people. They were not aware of this built in functionality and capabilities. Well Oracle Data Mining and Oracle Advanced Analytics has been built into the following Oracle Fusion Applications.

  • Oracle Fusion HCM Workforce Predictions
  • Oracle Fusion CRM Sales Prediction Engine
  • Oracle Spend Classification
  • Oracle Sales Prospector
  • Oracle Adaptive Access Manager

Oracle Data Mining and Oracle Advanced Applications are also being used in the following applications:

  • Oracle Airline Data Model
  • Oracle Communications Data Model
  • Oracle Retail Data Model
  • Oracle Security Governor for Healthcare

I intend to submit a presentation on this topic to future Oracle User Group conferences as a way of spreading the Advanced Analytics message within the Oracle user community. If you would like me to present on this topic at your conference or SIG drop me an email and we can make the necessary arrangement πŸ™‚

Oracle 11.2g install on OLE 6.x

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This notes are really just a reminder to myself of the typical “issues” that I encounter every time I do a new install of OEL 6.x and 11.2.0.4

These notes are in addition to the excellent installation instructions given by oracle-base.com: oel install, DB 11.2.0.x install

The notes listed below are just a reminder to myself of things that I seem to always have to look up. If you finish them useful then great.

1. Display issue & Installer not able to run

install says to do xhost +:0.0 this can give an error

instead do host +:0.0 and that should allow the installer to run

2. Now enough swap space when installer checks the pre-requisites

Need to add an addition 500M to the swap space

su (and then enter the password)

dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/swapfile bs=1M count=500

mkswap /tmp/swapfile

swapon /tmp/swapfile

exit (to return to the oracle user)

you can then turn off the extra space (if you really need to) after the install is finished

swapoff /tmp/swapfile

rm /tmp/swapfile


3. Post-Installation task

don’t forget the final step, to set to restart flag

as root

vi /etc/oratab

change the following line to have the Y at the end (instead of the N)

DB11G:/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1:Y


4. Set up the automated start and stop of the DB

Again Oracle-Base gives an excellent set of instructions for doing this. Click here.

Installing Oracle 12c on Windows 7 64bit

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Here are the steps I when through to install Oracle 12.1c on Windows 7 64 bit.

  • Unzip the two 12c downloads files into the same directory. I called this directory database

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  • Go down a couple of levels in the database directory until you come to the directory that contains setup.exe. Double click on this to start the installer.
  • Step 1 – Configure Security Updates:Β  Un-tick the tick-box and click the Next button. A warning message will appear. You can click on the Yes button to proceed.
  • Step 2 – Software Update : select the Skip Software Updates option and then click the Next button.
  • Step 3 – Installation Option : select the Create and Configure a Database option and then click the Next button.
  • Step 4 – System Class: Select the Server Class option and then click the Next button
  • Step 5 – Grid Installation Options : Select the Single Instance Database Installation option and then click the next button.
  • Step 6 – Install Types : Select the Typical install option and then click the Next button.
  • Step 7 – Installation Location : Select the Use Windows Built-in Account option and then click the Next button. An warning message appears. Click the Yes button.
  • Step 8 – Typical Installation.Β  Set Global Database Name to cdb12c for the container database name. Set the Administrative password for the container database. Set the name of the pluggable database that will be created. Set this to pdb12c. Or you can accept the default names. Then click the Next button. If you get a warning message saying the password does not conform to the recommended standards, you can click the Yes button to ignore this warning and proceed.
  • Step 9 – Prerequisite Checks : the install will check to see that you have enough space and necessary permissions etc.
  • Step 10 – Summary – You should now be ready to start the install. Click the Install button.

You can now sit back, relax and watch the installation of 12.1c complete.

You may get some Windows Security Alert windows pop up. Just click on the Allow Access button.

image

Then the Database Configuration Assistant will start. This step might take a while to complete.

image

When everything is done you will get something like the following

image

Now you are almost ready to start using your Pluggable 12c database on windows. The final two steps that you need to do is to add an entry to your tnsnames.ora file. You can manually do this if you know what you are doing or you can select Net Configuration Assistant under the Oracle –Ora12cDB Home 1 section of the windows menu. The second thing you need to do is to create a new user/schema.

Check out my previous blog post called β€˜My first steps with 12c’ for how to do these last two steps. The β€˜My fist steps with 12c’ post was based on installing 12c on Linux 6.