Oracle Data Miner

my Oracle Data Miner Book

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Some of you may be aware that I have been writing a on Oracle Data Miner. Actually the book covers the Oracle Data Miner GUI that is part of SQL Developer, the SQL and PL/SQL functions, procedures and packages that form the Oracle Data Mining option in the database and lots of other topics for the DBA, Developer and BI/DW people.
Today is a bit day for this book as it is officially released and available for purchase. See below for some links to where you can but the book in print and e-book formats. It has been published by McGraw-Hill/Oracle Press.
The book is aimed at a variety of people and the aim of the book is to introduce them to using the Oracle Data Miner tool and how to perform various data mining and predictive analytics tasks using SQL and PL/SQL.
The book will not teach you about how each of the data mining algorithms works. There is a bit of an assumption that you know a bit about these already. There are lots of books and resources about that cover that material. You can look on my book as an getting start / how to use type of book.
Below are are the images of the front cover and the back cover.
Book Cover            Book Back Cover
For more details of the book and for some updates keep an eye on my ODM Book page. On this page I’m adding a FAQ secion. This will be based on questions that I receive about the book.
If you buy the book then I hope you will find it helpful. If you are going to attend one of my presentations at an Oracle User Group meeting then bring the book along and I can sign it for you. Alternatively if you are at Oracle Open World 2014, come along to the Oracle Press Book Store, as I will be there to sign books on Wednesdays 1st October between 13:00 and 13:30.
Where can you Buy my Oracle Data Miner book (print and e-book).
You can buy the book from the McGraw-Hill/Oracle Press website and from Amazon. Each site will offer discounts so check out which one is the best for you.
McGraw-Hill/Oracle Press
For USA locations (enter promo code Tierney to save 20% and free delivery) www.mhprofessional.com
For UK & Ireland locations (enter promo code Tierney to save 20% and free delivery) www.mcgraw-hill.co.uk/tpr
Amazon
Click here to buy it on www.amazom.com
Click here to but it on www.amazon.co.uk

ODM Repository upgrade Issue with 4.0.1

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An important announcement was made on the Oracle Data Mining discussion forum last night and I haven’t seen anything on twitter about it yet (but maybe I missed it). It was about some ODM Repository migration issues that you might encounter with using ODM in SQL Developer 4.0.1 and using the Oracle Database 11.2.0.3.

Check out the full announcement here.

Make sure you have a full backup of your ODM schema and the repository before you perform your ODM repository upgrade.

As most people are still on Oracle 11g then this is a potential problem that most of you maybe facing.

I had a a repository migration issues last September during Oracle Open World. EA2 was release and in my eagerness to upgrade (and because I was writing my book on it) I had an issue where my repository go dropped and a new repository created. But nothing was migrated over to the new repository.

Guess what? I lost all my work. I was at OOW and my back ups were back home in Ireland. So you can imagine how I felt.

Here is a link to my blog post about it.

Issues with using latest release of ODM

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The title of this blog post makes it sound more dramatic than it actually is.

The reason for this blog post is down to me receiving a recent comment on the blog, plus having received numerous emails and a recent OTN Discussion Forum topic for Oracle Data Mining.

The main thing that they have in common is that if I use the latest version of Oracle Data Mining (ODM) it tells me that I need to upgrade my ODM Repository. What impact will this have?

The ODM Repository stores lots of information about the workflows you create using the (free) Oracle Data Mining tool that comes as part of SQL Developer. Yes you do have to pay for the OAA option, so is it really free? Well some part are like the explore node and the graph node.

If you download and want to use the latest version of the ODM tool or you want to try it out before rolling it out to others then you will need to upgrade your ODM repository.

And this the problem that people are facing.

If you upgrade then the ODM Repository it is updated to work with the latest version of the ODM tool. But what happens to everyone else who is using the previous release of the tool? The answer to that is they can no longer use ODM against their database.

Why is that? Well the version of the tool is tied to a version of the Repository. If you upgrade to the newer tool and repository then your older versions of the ODM tool no longer work.

The result of all of this is that you cannot have a mixture of versions of the ODM tool (SQL Developer) being used in your team/company.

There is a very simple solution to all of this. Everyone uses the same version of the ODM tool (i.e. the same version of SQL Developer). For example your team might be using SQL Dev 4 that was released last December. But in early March there was a new patch release 4.1. In order to use this new version of the tool all of your team needs to start using it at the same time. The first person to use it will be prompted to migrate the ODM repository. This is automatically done once you enter the password for SYS.

But in some teams this is not possible to do, you want to try out the tool to see that it works correctly before getting others to use it. The way around this is to have a separate database and use it for your testing. You can easily copy across your workflows and ODM objects to the test database.

This might not be possible for everyone, so what can you do. Create a Virtual Machine and try it out on your own desktop is one way.

The answer to this problem is not ideal, but hopefully you have a better idea of why things are happening this way and what you can or cannot do about it.

Like I said at the topic of this blog post that the title is a bit more dramatic than is really the case 🙂

My next blog post will be on another question I’ve been asked a few times and this is ‘When I go to use the ODM tool it tells me that the Oracle Text feature of Oracle needs to be enabled’

ODM: Changing the bar chart format in Explore Node

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In Oracle Data Miner you can use the Explore Node to gather an initial set of statistics for your dataset. As part of this you will also get a bar chart that shows the distributions of the values contained within each attribute. The following example shows the default layout of the bar charts. Explore1

These graphs a very useful for presenting the initial data exploration results from to your business users. In addition to these graphs you can also use the Graph node to give some additional graphical representations.

But the default bar chart that is produced by the Explore Node can appear to be a bit basic.

So what if we could change the layout to have a 3-D effect. People like 3-D bar charts.

Is this possible in Oracle Data Miner? If so then how can we do it?

Well it is possible and you can use the following steps to change your bar charts to 3-D.

To access the Explore Node settings go the the Tools menu and then select Preferences from the drop down menu.

Explore2

Then the Preferences window opens scroll down to the Data Miner option and expand the available options.

Explore3

The Explorer Data Viewer allows you to change the Precision settings. The section option is the Graphical Settings. You can change the Depth Radius setting. By default this is set to Zero. By increasing this value you can change the degree of the 3-D effect of the bar charts. You can also change the colour scheme too.

Explore4

I’m not a fan of the other colour schemes that are available and mu favourite is still the default Nautical. The following bar chart is the same as the one at the top of this post but has the 3-D effect.

Explore5

ODM Graph Node new feature

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With the recent release of SQL Developer 4.0.1 there has been some very minor bug fixes for Oracle Data Miner. But there has been one particular enhancement that I wanted to have a look at. This blog post will look at this new feature and how you can use it too. In the previously released version of the Oracle Data Miner tool we had a Graph Node. This is really a new feature that came with SQL Developer 4 and was available in the Early Adopter releases since July 2013. During the Early Adopter releases and with the official release of SQL Dev 4, the Line Graph feature of the Graph Node only allowed you to have one line drawn i.e. for a single Y attribute. Now in SQL Dev/ODM 4.0.1 the Graph Node has been updated to allow you to have multiple Line Graphs that are stacked. To illustrate this we will need to define what data source we are going to use and to create a shell of a Graph Node in Oracle Data Miner. The following diagram illustrates this. In this example I’m using the CARS data set that is available on OTN.

New graph

When you have these nodes created you are now ready to create your graphs. To do this double click on the Graph Node. You can now set the attribute to use for the X-axis, in my example this will be MODEL_YEAR. Then for the Y-Axis select the attributes you want to include in the stacked graph by holding down the control key as you select each attribute

New graph2

You are now ready to create the graph. To do this click on the OK button and you will have your stacked line graph.

New graph3

Upgrading to SQL Dev 4 & Oracle Data Miner 4

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The production release of SQL Developer 4 and Oracle Data Miner 4 has just been released. If you are like me you will want to upgrade and start using this latest release. For me I particularly want to be using the new Oracle Data Miner 4.  Over the past (almost) 6 months I’ve been working with the Early Adopter versions (EAs) with some degree of frustration. So hopefully it will be all working now.

To download the production version of SQL Developer 4 that include Oracle Data Miner go to here.

The following are the steps that I followed to get SQL Developer installed and to migrate my Oracle Data Miner Repository.  I’m running a 12.1c Oracle Database.

1. Download and unzip the SQL Developer software. Go to the \sqldeveloper folder to locate the sqldeveloper.exe file. I created a shortcut on my desktop for this. When ready then run this file.

2. As SQL Developer is opening you will get the typical splash screen and at some point you will be asked about migrating your preferences from your previous release. In my case I’m migrating from EA1. I select Yes.

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After a few more seconds SQL Developer should open with all your previous settings.

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3. Now to update and migrate your existing Oracle Data Mining Repository to the new versions. To start this process, to to the Tool Menu and then select Data Miner –> Make Visible

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This will open the Oracle Data Miner Connections tab and the Workflow Jobs tab. If you don’t make do this step then your Oracle Data Miner workflows may not run.

4. Double click on one of your schemas in the Data Miner Connection tab.

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5. Before you upgrade your repository it is advisable to take a full backup of your database, and to export your workflows. Just in case anything might happen during the Repository upgrade. I cannot stress this enough, because during a previous upgrade my repository got wiped and I had to rely on my backups.

5. The version of the repository will be check and if it needs updating then you will get the following window. I’m migrating from EA1 so you might get a slightly different messages. It all depends on what version you were previously using. Select Yes.

image

6. Next you will need to give the SYS password (or talk nicely to your DBA). Then you will get a warning about disconnecting your session from the repository. Click OK.

image

Then you can click on the Start Button

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Everything should finish after a few minutes.

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7. Open one of your workflows and run it to make sure all is OK.

 

Based on my initial few hours of working with the production version of SQL Developer 4 and Oracle Data Miner 4 is that it seems to run a lot quicker than the Early Adopter versions.

Watch out for some blog posts over the coming weeks about some of the new features that are available in SQL Developer 4.  Like my previous blog posts, the new posts will be how-to type of articles.

Running PL/SQL Procedures in Parallel

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As your data volumes increase, particularly as you evolve into the big data world, you will be start to see that your Oracle Data Mining scoring functions will start to take longer and longer.  To apply an Oracle Data Mining model to new data is a very quick process. The models are, what Oracle calls, first class objects in the database. This basically means that they run Very quickly with very little overhead.

But as the data volumes increase you will start to see that your Apply process or scoring the data will start to take longer and longer. As with all OLTP or OLAP environments as the data grows you will start to use other in-database features to help your code run quicker. One example of this is to use the Parallel Option.

You can use the Parallel Option to run your Oracle Data Mining functions in real-time and in batch processing mode. The examples given below shows you how you can do this.

Let us first start with some basics. What are the typical commands necessary to setup our schema or objects to use Parallel. The following commands are examples of what we can use

ALTER session enable parallel dml;
ALTER TABLE table_name PARALLEL (DEGREE 8);
ALTER TABLE table_name NOPARALLEL;
CREATE TABLE … PARALLEL degree …
ALTER  TABLE … PARALLEL degree …
CREATE INDEX … PARALLEL degree …
ALTER  INDEX … PARALLEL degree …

You can force parallel operations for tables that have a degree of 1 by using the force option.

ALTER SESSION ENABLE PARALLEL DDL;
ALTER SESSION ENABLE PARALLEL DML;
ALTER SESSION ENABLE PARALLEL QUERY;

alter session force parallel query PARALLEL 2

You can disable parallel processing with the following session statements.

ALTER SESSION DISABLE PARALLEL DDL;
ALTER SESSION DISABLE PARALLEL DML;
ALTER SESSION DISABLE PARALLEL QUERY;

We can also tell the database what degree of Parallelism to use

ALTER SESSION FORCE PARALLEL DDL PARALLEL 32;
ALTER SESSION FORCE PARALLEL DML PARALLEL 32;
ALTER SESSION FORCE PARALLEL QUERY PARALLEL 32;

 

Using your Oracle Data Mining model in real-time using Parallel

When you want to use your Oracle Data Mining model in real-time, on one record or a set of records you will be using the PREDICTION and PREDICTION_PROBABILITY function. The following example shows how a Classification model is being applied to some data in a view called MINING_DATA_APPLY_V.

column prob format 99.99999
SELECT cust_id,
       PREDICTION(DEMO_CLASS_DT_MODEL USING *)  Pred,
       PREDICTION_PROBABILITY(DEMO_CLASS_DT_MODEL USING *) Prob
FROM   mining_data_apply_v
WHERE  rownum <= 18
/

   CUST_ID       PRED      PROB
———- ———- ———
    100574          0    .63415
    100577          1    .73663
    100586          0    .95219
    100593          0    .60061
    100598          0    .95219
    100599          0    .95219
    100601          1    .73663
    100603          0    .95219
    100612          1    .73663
    100619          0    .95219
    100621          1    .73663
    100626          1    .73663
    100627          0    .95219
    100628          0    .95219
    100633          1    .73663
    100640          0    .95219
    100648          1    .73663
    100650          0    .60061

If the volume of data warrants the use of the Parallel option then we can add the necessary hint to the above query as illustrated in the example below.

SELECT /*+ PARALLEL(mining_data_apply_v, 4) */
       cust_id,
       PREDICTION(DEMO_CLASS_DT_MODEL USING *)  Pred,
       PREDICTION_PROBABILITY(DEMO_CLASS_DT_MODEL USING *) Prob
FROM   mining_data_apply_v
WHERE  rownum <= 18
/

If you turn on autotrace you will see that Parallel was used. So you should now be able to use your Oracle Data Mining models to work on a Very large number of records and by adjusting the degree of parallelism you can improvements.

Using your Oracle Data Mining model in Batch mode using Parallel

When you want to perform some batch scoring of your data using your Oracle Data Mining model you will have to use the APPLY procedure that is part of the DBMS_DATA_MINING package. But the problem with using a procedure or function is that you cannot give it a hint to tell it to use the parallel option. So unless you have the tables(s) setup with parallel and/or the session to use parallel, then you cannot run your Oracle Data Mining model in Parallel using the APPLY procedure.

So how can you get the DBMA_DATA_MINING.APPLY procedure to run in parallel?

The answer is that you can use the DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE package. The following steps walks you through what you need to do to use the DMBS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE package to run your Oracle Data Mining models in parallel.

The first step required is for you to put the DBMS_DATA_MINING.APPLY code into a stored procedure. The following code shows how our DEMO_CLASS_DT_MODEL can be used by the APPLY procedure and how all of this can be incorporated into a stored procedure called SCORE_DATA.

create or replace procedure score_data
is
begin

dbms_data_mining.apply(
  model_name => ‘DEMO_CLAS_DT_MODEL’,
  data_table_name => ‘NEW_DATA_TO_SCORE’,
  case_id_column_name => ‘CUST_ID’,
  result_table_name => ‘NEW_DATA_SCORED’);

end;
/

Next we need to create a Parallel Task for the DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE package. In the following example this is called ODM_SCORE_DATA.

— Create the TASK
  DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE.CREATE_TASK (‘ODM_SCORE_DATA’);

Next we need to define the Parallel Workload Chunks details

 -- Chunk the table by ROWID
DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE.CREATE_CHUNKS_BY_ROWID('ODM_SCORE_DATA', 'DMUSER', 'NEW_DATA_TO_SCORE', true, 100);
The scheduled jobs take an unassigned workload chunk, process it and will then move onto the next unassigned chunk. 
 
Now you are ready to execute the stored procedure for your Oracle Data Mining model, in parallel by 10.

DECLARE
   l_sql_stmt   varchar2(200);
BEGIN
   — Execute the DML in parallel
   l_sql_stmt := ‘begin score_data(); end;’;
  
   DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE.RUN_TASK(‘ODM_SCORE_DATA’, l_sql_stmt, DBMS_SQL.NATIVE,
                                  parallel_level => 10);
END;
/

When every thing is finished you can then clean up and remove the task using

BEGIN
   dbms_parallel_execute.drop_task(‘ODM_SCORE_DATA’);
END;
/

 

NOTE: The schema that will be running the above code will need to have the necessary privileges to run DBMS_SCHEDULER, for example

grant create job to dmuser;

Non-running workflows in ODMr 4 EA3

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If you are brave enough to be using the early adopter releases of ODMr you may have run into the issue with your workflows not running.

When you go to run your workflow you will get the following window and nothing else happens.

image

To get passed this you will need to kill SQL Developer using the task manager or equivalent.

So how do you stop this from happening so that you can get your workflows to run. The simple solutions is that you need to have the workflow tab open for the workflow to run correctly.

To do this you need to make Oracle Data Miner visible, by selecting Tools from the menu, then Data Miner and finally Make Visible

image

Then you will need to go to the View menu option, then select Data Miner and then Workflow Jobs

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Now your workflows will work and complete.

Hopefully this will be fixed in the production release of ODMr 4 (SQL Developer 4)

How to Fix Odd Layout Behaviour in ODM v4 EA1 & EA2

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If you have been using the last versions of the Oracle Data Miner tool that have been released as part of SQL Developer 4 EA1 and EA2, you may have noticed that the layout of your worksheets and other areas are inconsistent each time you open ODM.

This can be very frustrating as you have to rearrange the layout of the worksheets, property inspection, the ODM connections tab, etc, etc, etc.

This “feature” seems to be linked to when you installed the new version of the software. When you open SQL Dev 4 EA1 & EA2 you are asked if you would like to migrate your settings.  If you selected Yes for this then it is this that is causing the project.

How do you fix this?

1. Export your SQL Developer Connections. To do this go to the Connections tab and right click on Connections and select export from the menu

image

This will create a XML file.  Save this to your desktop so that you can find it easily later.

2. Locate the AppData directory for SQL Developer.  This really depends on your environment. If you are using Windows for your client then the AppData directory will be located somewhere live the following

C:\Users\\AppData\Roaming\SQL Developer

3. Rename the System4.0… Directory.  Located in the AppData/SQL Developer directory called some like  ‘system4.0.0.12.84’  if you have installed and migrated to SQL Dev 4 EA2.  Rename this directory to another name e.g. ‘system4.0.0.12.84_old’.  This effectively deletes all your setting for SQL Developer 4

4. Start SQL Dev 4.  When you start SQL Developer 4 EA1 or EA2 it will be like you are running the software for the first time.  But this time, when you are asked do you want to migrate your setting from an earlier version, select No.  This will create a clean system folder.

5. Import your Connections.  When SQL Developer opens you can right click on the connection link and select Import Connections (see image above). Then enter the name and location of the file you create in step 1 above.

 

After completing all of the above steps your unusual layout when you open ODM should now be fixed.

Adding Oracle Data Miner to OBIEE

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Oracle Data Miner is a very powerful tool that provides advanced machine learning algorithms that are embedded in the Oracle database. By using Oracle Data Miner you do not have to use another tool, from another vendor, to do your data mining. You can do everything in the database, ensuring that the security of your data is maintained and use all the performance functionality that comes with the database.
To add to the advanced insights that you can get from using ODM, you can combine ODM with your OBIEE dashboards to gain a deeper level of insight of your data. This is the combining of data mining techniques and visualization techniques.
The purpose of this blog post is to show you the steps involved in adding an ODM model to your OBIEE dashboards. Lots of people have been asking for the details of how to do it, so here it is.
The following example is based on a presentation that I have given a few times (OUG Ireland, UKOUG, OOW) with Antony Heljula.
1. Export & Import the ODM model
If your data mining analysis and development was completed in a different database to where your OBIEE data resides then you will need to move the ODM model from ODM/development database to the OBIEE database.
ODM provides two PL/SQL procedures to allow you to easily move your ODM model. These procedures are part of the DBMS_DATA_MINING package. To export a model you will need to use the DBMS_DATA_MINING.EXPORT_MODEL procedure. Similarly to import your (exported) ODM model you will use the DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL procedure.
2. Create a view that uses the ODM model
You can create a view that uses the PREDICTION and PREDICTION_PROBABILITY functions to apply the import ODM model to your data. For example the following view is used to score our customer data to make a prediction of they are going to churn and the probability that this prediction is correct.
SELECT st_pk,
       prediction(clas_decision_tree using *) WITHDRAW_PREDICTION,
       prediction_probability(clas_decision_tree using *) WITHDRAW_PROBABILITY
FROM   CUSTOMER_DATA;

clip_image002
3. Import the view into the Physical layer of the BI Repository (RPD)
The view was then imported into the Physical layer of the BI Repository (RPD) where it was joined on primary key to the other customer tables (we had one records per customer in the view). With the tables being joined, we can use the prediction columns to filter the customer data. For example filter all the customer who are likely to churn, WITHDRAW_PREDICTION = ‘N’
clip_image002[11]
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4.Add the new columns to the Business Model layer
The new prediction columns were then mapped into the Business Model layer where they could be incorporated into various relevant calculations e.g. % Withdrawals Predicted, and then subsequently presented to the end users for reporting
clip_image002[9]
5. Add to your Dashboards
The Withdraw prediction columns could then be published on the BI Dashboards where they could be used to filter the data content. In the example below, the use has chosen to show data for only those customers who are predicted to Withdraw with a probability rating of >70%
clip_image002[5]

Nested Tables (and Data) in Oracle & ODM

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Oracle Data Mining uses Nested data types/tables to store some of its data. Oracle Data Mining creates a number of tables/objects that contain nested data when it is preparing data for input to the data mining algorithms and when outputting certain results from the algorithms.  In Oracle 11.2g there are two nested data types used and in Oracle 12.1c we get an additional two nested data types. These are setup when you install the Oracle Data Miner Repository. If you log into SQL*Plus or SQL Developer you can describe them like any other table or object.

DM_NESTED_NUMERICALS

image

DM_NESTED_CATEGORICALS

image

The following two Nested data types are only available in 12.1c

DM_NESTED_BINARY_DOUBLES

image

DM_NESTED_BINARY_FLOATS

image

These Nested data types are used by Oracle Data Miner in preparing data for input to the data mining algorithms and for producing the some of the outputs from the algorithms.

Creating your own Nested Tables

To create your own Nested Data Types and Nested Tables you need to performs steps that are similar to what is illustrated in the following steps. These steps show you how to define a data type, how to create a nested table, how to insert data into the nested table and how to select the data from the nested table.

1. Set up the Object Type

Create a Type object that will defines the structure of the data. In these examples we want to capture the products and quantity purchased by a customer.

create type CUST_ORDER as object
(product_id     varchar2(6),
quantity_sold  number(6));
/

2. Create a Type as a Table

Now you need to create a Type as a table.

create type cust_orders_type as table of CUST_ORDER;
/

3. Create the table using the Nested Data

Now you can create the nested table.

create table customer_orders_nested (
cust_id       number(6) primary key,
order_date    date,
sales_person  varchar2(30),
c_order       CUST_ORDERS_TYPE)
NESTED TABLE c_order STORE AS c_order_table;

4. Insert a Record and Query

This insert statement shows you how to insert one record into the nested column.

insert into customer_orders_nested
values (1, sysdate, ‘BT’, CUST_ORDERS_TYPE(cust_order(‘P1’, 2)) );

When we select the data from the table we get

select * from customer_orders_nested;

   CUST_ID ORDER_DAT SALES_PERSON
———- ——— ——————————
C_ORDER(PRODUCT_ID, QUANTITY_SOLD)
—————————————————–
         1 19-SEP-13 BT
CUST_ORDERS_TYPE(CUST_ORDER(‘P1’, 2))

It can be a bit difficult to read the data in the nested column so we can convert the nested column into a table to display the results in a better way

select cust_id, order_date, sales_person, product_id, quantity_sold
from customer_orders_nested, table(c_order)

   CUST_ID ORDER_DAT SALES_PERSON                   PRODUC QUANTITY_SOLD
———- ——— —————————— —— ————-
         1 19-SEP-13 BT                             P1                 2

5. Insert many Nested Data items & Query

To insert many entries into the nested column you can do this

insert into customer_orders_nested
values (2, sysdate, ‘BT2’, CUST_ORDERS_TYPE(CUST_ORDER(‘P2’, 2), CUST_ORDER(‘P3’,3)));

When we do a Select * we get

   CUST_ID ORDER_DAT SALES_PERSON
———- ——— ——————————
C_ORDER(PRODUCT_ID, QUANTITY_SOLD)
————————————————————-
         1 19-SEP-13 BT
CUST_ORDERS_TYPE(CUST_ORDER2(‘P1’, 2))

         2 19-SEP-13 BT2
CUST_ORDERS_TYPE(CUST_ORDER2(‘P2’, 2), CUST_ORDER2(‘P3’, 3))

Again it is not easy to ready the data in the nested column, so if we convert it to a table again we now get a row being displayed for each entry in the nested column.

select cust_id, order_date, sales_person, product_id, quantity_sold
from customer_orders_nested, table(c_order);

   CUST_ID ORDER_DAT SALES_PERSON                   PRODUC QUANTITY_SOLD
———- ——— —————————— —— ————-
         1 19-SEP-13 BT                             P1                 2
         2 19-SEP-13 BT2                            P2                 2
         2 19-SEP-13 BT2                            P3                 3

Upgrading ODMr and SQL Dev forEA2

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The Early Adopter 2 of Oracle SQL Developer was released yesterday (Thursday 12th Sept). To install this new version of the Tool, including Oracle Data Miner, you can follow the instructions below

  • Go to the EA2 download page and download the EA2 release
  • Unzip the EA2 download
  • Create a new shortcut that point to the sqldeveloper.exe
  • Start SQL Developer EA2
  • You will be prompted for the location of the Java JDK. On my VM it was  C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0_25. 
  • Next you are prompted about importing your setting from the previous version. Select Yes.
  • After the setting have been imported SQL Developer will open and you are now able to enjoy

Oracle Data Miner

  • For Oracle Data Miner you need to make the option visible by selecting Tools->Data Miner->Make Visible. This will open the ODM connection tabs along with a couple of others. I’m running the following on a 12.1c database.
  • Open one of your ODM connections by double clicking on it.
  • ODM will check the version of the ODM repository in the DB. You will be prompted to upgrade the ODM repository to the latest version. Click on the Yes button

image

  • Enter the SYS password, or talk nicely to your DBA.

image

  • Then click the Start button to start the ODM repository upgrade

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  • This will take anything from a minute to 10 minutes, depending on the location of the DB and your network.
  • When everything is finished you can close the window and start using Oracle Data Miner by opening an existing workflow or by creating a new one.