Oracle R Enterprise

Installing RStudio Server on an (Oracle) Linux server

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In a previous blog post I showed how you can install and get started with using RStudio on a server by using RStudio Server. My previous post showed how you could do that on the Oracle BigDataLite VM. On this VM everything was nicely scripted and set up for you. But when it comes to installing it on a different server, well things can be a bit different.

The purpose of this blog post is to go through the install steps you need to follow on your own server or Oracle Database server. The following is based on a server that is setup with Oracle Linux. (I’m actually using the Oracle DB Developer VM).

1. Download the latest version of RStudio Server.

Use the following link to download RStudio Server. But do a quick check on the RStudio server to get the current version number.

wget https://download2.rstudio.org/rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm

The following shows you what you will see when you run this command.

--2016-03-16 06:22:30--  https://download2.rstudio.org/rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm
Resolving download2.rstudio.org (download2.rstudio.org)... 54.192.28.107, 54.192.28.54, 54.192.28.12, ...
Connecting to download2.rstudio.org (download2.rstudio.org)|54.192.28.107|:443... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 38814908 (37M) [application/x-redhat-package-manager]
Saving to: ‘rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm’

100%[============================================================>] 38,814,908  6.54MB/s   in 6.0s  

2016-03-16 06:22:37 (6.17 MB/s) - ‘rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm’ saved [38814908/38814908]

2. Install RStudio Server

sudo yum install --nogpgcheck rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm

when prompted if it is OK to install, enter y (highlighted in bold below)

Loaded plugins: langpacks
Examining rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm: rstudio-server-0.99.892-1.x86_64
Marking rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64.rpm to be installed
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package rstudio-server.x86_64 0:0.99.892-1 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
ol7_UEKR3/x86_64                                                                    | 1.2 kB  00:00:00    
ol7_addons/x86_64                                                                   | 1.2 kB  00:00:00    
ol7_latest/x86_64                                                                   | 1.4 kB  00:00:00    
ol7_optional_latest/x86_64                                                          | 1.2 kB  00:00:00    

Dependencies Resolved

===========================================================================================================
 Package               Arch          Version             Repository                                   Size
===========================================================================================================
Installing:
 rstudio-server        x86_64        0.99.892-1          /rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.892-x86_64        280 M

Transaction Summary
===========================================================================================================
Install  1 Package

Total size: 280 M
Installed size: 280 M

Is this ok [y/d/N]: y

Downloading packages:
Running transaction check
Running transaction test
Transaction test succeeded
Running transaction
  Installing : rstudio-server-0.99.892-1.x86_64                                                        1/1
groupadd: group 'rstudio-server' already exists
rsession: no process found
ln -s '/etc/systemd/system/rstudio-server.service' '/etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/rstudio-server.service'
rstudio-server.service - RStudio Server
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/rstudio-server.service; enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Wed 2016-03-16 10:46:00 PDT; 1s ago
  Process: 3191 ExecStart=/usr/lib/rstudio-server/bin/rserver (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 3192 (rserver)
   CGroup: /system.slice/rstudio-server.service
           ├─3192 /usr/lib/rstudio-server/bin/rserver
           └─3205 /usr/lib64/R/bin/exec/R --slave --vanilla -e cat(R.Version()$major,R.Version()$minor,~+~sep=".")

Mar 16 10:46:00 localhost.localdomain systemd[1]: Started RStudio Server.
  Verifying  : rstudio-server-0.99.892-1.x86_64                                                        1/1

Installed:
  rstudio-server.x86_64 0:0.99.892-1                                                                      

Complete!

3. Open RStudio using a web browser.

Open your favourite web browser and put in the host name or the IP address of your server. In my example I’m using the Oracle DB Developer VM to demonstrate the install, so I can use localhost, followed by the port number for RStudio Server.

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Log in using your Server username and password. This is oracle/oracle on the VM.

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4. Use and Enjoy

If you get logged into RStudio Server then you will see a screen something like the following!

Job Done and Enjoy!

5. An Extra Step is using the Oracle DB Developer VM

If you want to use RStudio on the Oracle DB Developer VM from your local OS, then you will need to open the port 8787 on the VM. To do this power down the VM, if you have it open. The open the Network section of the VM settings. I’m using VirtualBox. And then click on the Port Forwarding.

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Click on OK to save your Port Forwarding setting and then click on the OK button again to close the Network settings for the VM.

Now start up the VM. When it has loaded and you have the desktop displayed in the VM window, you should now be able to connect to RStudio in the VM, from your local machine.

To do this open your web browser on your local machine and type in

http://localhost:8787

You should now get the RStudio login in screen that is shown in point 3 above. Go ahead, login and enjoy.

6. A little warning

Make sure to log out of RStudio when you are finished using it. If you don’t then your R environment may not have been saved and you will get a message when you log in next. Now we don’t want that happenings, so just log out of RStudio. You can do that by looking at the top right hand corner of the RStudio Server application.

I will have one more blog post on how you can configure RStudion Server to work with an Oracle Database server that has Oracle R Enterprise installed.

Installing RStudio Server on Oracle BigDataLite VM

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A very popular tool for data scientists is RStudio. This tool allows you to interactively work with your R code, view the R console, the graphs and charts you create, manage the various objects and data frames you create, as well shaving easy access to the R help documentation. Basically it is a core everyday tool.

The typical approach is to have RStudio installed on your desktop or laptop. What this really means is that the data is pulled to your desktop or laptop and all analytics is performed there. In most cases this is fine but as your data volumes goes does does the limitations of using R on your local machine.

An alternative is to install a version called RStudio Server on an analytics server or on the database server. You can now use the computing capabilities of this server to overcome some of the limitations of using R or RStudio locally. Now you will use your web browser to access RStudio Server on your database server.

In this blog post I will walk you through how to install and get connected to RStudio Server on the Oracle BigDataLite VM.

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After starting up the Oracle BigDataLite VM and logging into the Oracle user (password=welcome1) you will see the Start Here icon on the desktop. You will need to double click on this.

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This will open a webpage on the VM that contains details of all the various tools that are installed on the VM or are ready for you to install and configure. This information contains all the http addresses and ports you need to access each of these tools via a web browser or some other way, along with the usernames and passwords you need to use them.

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One of the tools lists is for RStudio Server. This product is not installed on the VM but Oracle has provided a script that you can run to perform the install in an automated way. This script is located in:

[oracle@bigdatalite ~]$ cd  /home/oracle/scripts/

Use the following command to run the RStudio Server install script.

[oracle@bigdatalite scripts]$ ./install_rstudio.sh

The following is the output from running this script and it will be displayed in your terminal window. You can use this to monitor the progress of the installation.

Retrieving RStudio
--2016-03-12 02:06:15--  https://download2.rstudio.org/rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.489-x86_64.rpm
Resolving download2.rstudio.org... 54.192.28.12, 54.192.28.54, 54.192.28.98, ...
Connecting to download2.rstudio.org|54.192.28.12|:443... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 34993428 (33M) [application/x-redhat-package-manager]
Saving to: `rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.489-x86_64.rpm'

100%[======================================>] 34,993,428  5.24M/s   in 10s     

2016-03-12 02:06:26 (3.35 MB/s) - `rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.489-x86_64.rpm' saved [34993428/34993428]

Installing RStudio
Loaded plugins: refresh-packagekit, security, ulninfo
Setting up Install Process
Examining rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.489-x86_64.rpm: rstudio-server-0.99.489-1.x86_64
Marking rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.489-x86_64.rpm to be installed
public_ol6_UEKR3_latest                                  | 1.2 kB     00:00     
public_ol6_UEKR3_latest/primary                          |  22 MB     00:03     
public_ol6_UEKR3_latest                                                 568/568
public_ol6_latest                                        | 1.4 kB     00:00     
public_ol6_latest/primary                                |  55 MB     00:12     
public_ol6_latest                                                   33328/33328
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package rstudio-server.x86_64 0:0.99.489-1 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

================================================================================
 Package        Arch   Version       Repository                            Size
================================================================================
Installing:
 rstudio-server x86_64 0.99.489-1    /rstudio-server-rhel-0.99.489-x86_64 251 M

Transaction Summary
================================================================================
Install       1 Package(s)

Total size: 251 M
Installed size: 251 M
Downloading Packages:
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
  Installing : rstudio-server-0.99.489-1.x86_64                             1/1 
useradd: user 'rstudio-server' already exists
groupadd: group 'rstudio-server' already exists
rsession: no process killed
rstudio-server start/running, process 5037
  Verifying  : rstudio-server-0.99.489-1.x86_64                             1/1 

Installed:
  rstudio-server.x86_64 0:0.99.489-1                                            

Complete!
Restarting RStudio
rstudio-server stop/waiting
rsession: no process killed
rstudio-server start/running, process 5066

When the installation is finished you are now ready to connect to the RStudio Server. So open your web browser and enter the following into the address bar.

http://localhost:8787/

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The initial screen you are presented with is a login screen. Enter your Linux username and password. In the case of the BigDataLite VM this will be oracle/welcome1.

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Then you will be presented with the RStudio Server application in your web browser, as shown below. As you can see it is very similar to using RStudio on your desktop. Happy Days! You are now setup and able to run RStudio on the database server.

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Make sure to log out of RStudio Server before closing down the window.

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If you don’t log out of RStudio Server then the next time you open RStudio Server your session will automatically open. Perhaps this is not the best for security, so try to remember to log out each time.

By now using RStudio Server on the Oracle Database server I can not get some of the benefits of computing capabilities of this server. Although there are still the typical limitations with of using R. But now I access RStudio on the database server and process the data on the database server, all from my local PC or laptop.

Everything is nicely setup and ready for you to install on the BigDataLite VM (thank you Oracle). But what about when we want to install RStudion Server on a different server. What are the steps necessary to install, configure and log in. Yes they should be similar but I will give a complete list of steps in my next blog post.

Recoding variable values using ore.recode

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Oracle R Enterprise comes with a vast array of features that not really documented anywhere. One of these features that I’ve recently found useful is the ore.recode() function.

The following code illustrates how you can records the values in an existing attributes or (more specifically in this example) how you can create a new attribute based on the values in another attribute.

The data set that I’m using is the White Wine data set that can be found on the UCI Machine Learning Repository Archive website. You can download this data set and load it into a table in your Oracle schema using just two commands.

> WhiteWine = read.table("http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/wine-quality/winequality-white.csv",
                        sep=";", header=TRUE)
> ore.create(WhiteWine, table="WHITE_WINE")

This data set has an attribute called “quality”. This “quality” attribute contains values ranging from 2 to 8, and indicates the quality of the wine.

A typical task you may want to do is to relabel values into attributes to something a bit more meaningful or to group some values into a more standardised value.

To demonstrate this I want to create a new attribute that contains a description of the type of wine (and who I might share it with).

In this case, and to allow for other values in future versions of the data sets I’ve coded up the following:

quality  grade
-------  ----------------
1        Paint Stripper
2        Vinegar
3        Barely Drinkable
4        For the in-laws
5        For my family
6        To share with friends
7        For cooking
8        To share with my wife
9        Mine all Mine

The next step we need to perform is to gather some information about the values in the “quality” attribute. We can use the table command to quickly perform the aggregations, and then use the marplot function to graph the distributions.

> WHITE_WINE2  table(WHITE_WINE2$quality)
> barplot(table(WHITE_WINE2$quality), xlab="Wine Quality Ranking")

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Now we are ready to perform the recoding of the values using the ore.recode() function.

> WHITE_WINE2$grade <- ore.recode(WHITE_WINE2$quality, old=c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), 
                     new=c("1-Paint Stripper", "2-Vinegar", "3-Barely Drinkable",
                           "4-For the in-laws", "5-For my family", "6-To share with friends", 
                           "7-For cooking", "8-To share with my wife", 
                           "9-Mine all Mine"))

You can now go and inspect the data, perform a frequency count and compare the values with what we had previously.

> head(WHITE_WINE2[,c("quality", "grade")]) 
> table(WHITE_WINE2$grade) 

The final step is to write the newly modified data set back to your Oracle schema into a new table. This is to ensure that the original data is modified so that it can be used or reused later.

> ore.create(WHITE_WINE2, "WHITE_WINE2")

ORE video : Demo Code Part 5

Posted on Updated on

The following is the fifth and final set of demo code from my video on using R in the Oracle Database. Check out the video before using the following code. The blog post for the video will be updated to contain links to all blog posts that have the various demo code.

The following examples illustrate how you can use the Oracle R Enterprise capabilities within SQL and PL/SQL. The following illustrate building a GLM model using the glm algorithm that comes with the R language, and then uses this mode to score or label new data that is stored in a table. The last part of the example illustrates how you can perform What-If analysis using this ORE model

-- Build & save the R script, called Demo_GLM in the DB
--  This builds a GLM  DM model in the DB
--
Begin
   sys.rqScriptDrop('Demo_GLM');
   sys.rqScriptCreate('Demo_GLM',
      'function(dat,datastore_name) {
          mod <- glm(AFFINITY_CARD ~ CUST_GENDER + AGE + CUST_MARITAL_STATUS + COUNTRY_NAME + CUST_INCOME_LEVEL + EDUCATION + HOUSEHOLD_SIZE + YRS_RESIDENCE, dat, family = binomial())
       ore.save(mod, name=datastore_name, overwrite=TRUE)   }');
end;
/

--
-- After creating the script you need to run it to create the GLM model
--
select * 	
from table(rqTableEval(
             cursor(select CUST_GENDER,
                           AGE,
                           CUST_MARITAL_STATUS,
                           COUNTRY_NAME,
                           CUST_INCOME_LEVEL,
                           EDUCATION,
                           HOUSEHOLD_SIZE,
                           YRS_RESIDENCE,
                           AFFINITY_CARD
                    from mining_data_build_v),
             cursor(select 1 as "ore.connect", 'myDatastore' as "datastore_name” from dual),
                  'XML', 'Demo_GLM' ));


--
-- There are 2 ways to use the GLM model : in Batch and in Real-Time mode
--
-- First Step : Build the in-database R script to score you new data
--
Begin
   sys.rqScriptDrop('Demo_GLM_Batch');
   sys.rqScriptCreate('Demo_GLM_Batch',
      'function(dat, datastore_name) {
      ore.load(datastore_name)
      prd <- predict(mod, newdata=dat)
      prd[as.integer(rownames(prd))] <- prd
      res <- cbind(dat, PRED = prd)
      res}');
end;
/

-- 
-- Now you can run the script to score the new data in Batch model
--   The data is located in the table MINING_DATA_APPLY
--
select * from table(rqTableEval(
              cursor(select CUST_GENDER, AGE, CUST_MARITAL_STATUS, COUNTRY_NAME, CUST_INCOME_LEVEL, EDUCATION, HOUSEHOLD_SIZE, YRS_RESIDENCE
                     from   MINING_DATA_APPLY_V
                     where rownum <= 10),
             cursor(select 1 as "ore.connect", 'myDatastore' as "datastore_name" from dual),
             'select CUST_GENDER, AGE, CUST_MARITAL_STATUS, COUNTRY_NAME, CUST_INCOME_LEVEL, EDUCATION, HOUSEHOLD_SIZE, YRS_RESIDENCE, 1 PRED from MINING_DATA_APPLY_V','Demo_GLM_Batch'))
order by 1, 2, 3;

--
-- Now let us use the Demo_GLM_Batch script to score data in Real-Time
--  The data values are passed to the GLM model
--
select * from table(rqTableEval(
              cursor(select 'M' CUST_GENDER,
                            23 AGE,
                            'Married' CUST_MARITAL_STATUS, 
                            'United States of America' COUNTRY_NAME,
                            'B: 30,000 - 49,999' CUST_INCOME_LEVEL, 
                            'Assoc-A' EDUCATION,
                            '3' HOUSEHOLD_SIZE, 
                            5 YRS_RESIDENCE
                     from dual),
              cursor(select 'myDatastore' "datastore_name", 1 "ore.connect" from dual),
                    'select CUST_GENDER, AGE, CUST_MARITAL_STATUS, COUNTRY_NAME, CUST_INCOME_LEVEL, EDUCATION, HOUSEHOLD_SIZE, YRS_RESIDENCE, 1 PRED from MINING_DATA_APPLY',
              'Demo_GLM_Batch')) order by 1, 2, 3; 

ORE video : Demo Code Part 4

Posted on Updated on

The following is the fourth set of demo code from my video on using R in the Oracle Database. Check out the video before using the following code. The blog post for the video will be updated to contain links to all blog posts that have the various demo code.

The following code example illustrate how you can build a Data Mining model using the in-database data mining algorithms. In this example a Decision Tree model is created. This model is then applied to new data, scoring this data with the predicted values.

> #
> # Build am in-database ODM Decision Tree
> #
> dtData  # Create a ODM DT model in the DB : Only a temporary model. It is deleted when you logout
> dtModel  # View the details of the ODM model
> #summary(dtModel)
> names(dtModel)
 [1] "name"          "settings"      "attributes"    "costs"         "distributions”
 [6] "nodes"         "formula"       "extRef"        "call"         
> dtModel$name
 [1] "ORE$208_210”
> dtModel$settings
                          value
prep.auto                    on
impurity.metric   impurity.gini
term.max.depth                7
term.minpct.node           0.05
term.minpct.split           0.1
term.minrec.node             10
term.minrec.split            20
> dtModel$attributes
                 name        type data.type data.length precision scale is.target
1       AFFINITY_CARD categorical    number          22         0     0      TRUE
2                 AGE   numerical    number          22        NA    NA     FALSE
3 CUST_MARITAL_STATUS categorical  varchar2          20        NA    NA     FALSE
4           EDUCATION categorical  varchar2          21        NA    NA     FALSE
5      HOUSEHOLD_SIZE categorical  varchar2          21        NA    NA     FALSE
6          OCCUPATION categorical  varchar2          21        NA    NA     FALSE
7       YRS_RESIDENCE   numerical    number          22        NA    NA     FALSE
>

> ## Compute the Compusion Matrix
> dtResults  with(dtResults, table(AFFINITY_CARD, PREDICTION))
             PREDICTION
AFFINITY_CARD    0    1
            0 1056   64
            1  201  179
> ## How do you persist the model in the DB
> ##     Rename and save the model in the database
> dtModel$name
 [1] "ORE$208_210"

> ## Save the ODM model in the in-database R datastore
> ore.save(dtModel, name = "ORE_MODELS", overwrite=TRUE)
> ore.load(name = "ORE_MODELS")
 [1] "dtModel"

> ## Score new data using the DM Model
> ore.sync(table = c("MINING_DATA_APPLY"))
> ore.ls()
 [1] "DEMO_R_APPLY_RESULT"   "DEMO_R_TABLE"          "DEMO_SUBSET_TABLE"    
 [4] "INSUR_CUST_LTV_SAMPLE" "MINING_DATA_APPLY"     "MINING_DATA_BUILD_V"  
 [7] "MINING_DATA_TEST_V"   > dtApply  dim(dtApply)
 [1] 1500   18
> class(dtApply)
 [1] "ore.frame”
 attr(,"package")
 [1] "OREbase”
> DTAPPLY  dtApplyResult  dtApplyResult  head(dtApplyResult)
             '0'        '1' PREDICTION
100001 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100002 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100003 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100004 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100005 0.2633745 0.73662551          1
100006 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
> dim(dtApplyResult)
 [1] 1500    3
> dim(dtApply)
 [1] 1500   18
> dtResults  dim(dtResults)
 [1] 1500   21
> ore.drop(table = "DEMO_R_APPLY_RESULT")
> ore.create(dtApplyResult, table="DEMO_R_APPLY_RESULT")
> ## Run the following for the first time you will rename a mode
> # ore.exec(paste("BEGIN> 
  #                  DBMS_DATA_MINING.RENAME_MODEL(model_name => '", dtModel$name, "',> 
  #                      new_model_name => 'DEMO_R_DT_MODEL'); END;",sep=""))> 
  ## Run the following to refresh an existing model
> ore.exec(paste("BEGIN
+ DBMS_DATA_MINING.DROP_MODEL('DEMO_R_DT_MODEL');
+ DBMS_DATA_MINING.RENAME_MODEL(model_name => '", dtModel$name,"',
+ new_model_name => 'DEMO_R_DT_MODEL');
+ END;",sep=""))

ORE video : Demo Code Part 4

Posted on Updated on

The following is the fourth set of demo code from my video on using R in the Oracle Database. Check out the video before using the following code. The blog post for the video will be updated to contain links to all blog posts that have the various demo code.

The following code example illustrate how you can build a Data Mining model using the in-database data mining algorithms. In this example a Decision Tree model is created. This model is then applied to new data, scoring this data with the predicted values.

> #
> # Build am in-database ODM Decision Tree
> #
> dtData  # Create a ODM DT model in the DB : Only a temporary model. It is deleted when you logout
> dtModel  # View the details of the ODM model
> #summary(dtModel)
> names(dtModel)
 [1] "name"          "settings"      "attributes"    "costs"         "distributions”
 [6] "nodes"         "formula"       "extRef"        "call"         
> dtModel$name
 [1] "ORE$208_210”
> dtModel$settings
                          value
prep.auto                    on
impurity.metric   impurity.gini
term.max.depth                7
term.minpct.node           0.05
term.minpct.split           0.1
term.minrec.node             10
term.minrec.split            20
> dtModel$attributes
                 name        type data.type data.length precision scale is.target
1       AFFINITY_CARD categorical    number          22         0     0      TRUE
2                 AGE   numerical    number          22        NA    NA     FALSE
3 CUST_MARITAL_STATUS categorical  varchar2          20        NA    NA     FALSE
4           EDUCATION categorical  varchar2          21        NA    NA     FALSE
5      HOUSEHOLD_SIZE categorical  varchar2          21        NA    NA     FALSE
6          OCCUPATION categorical  varchar2          21        NA    NA     FALSE
7       YRS_RESIDENCE   numerical    number          22        NA    NA     FALSE
>

> ## Compute the Compusion Matrix
> dtResults  with(dtResults, table(AFFINITY_CARD, PREDICTION))
             PREDICTION
AFFINITY_CARD    0    1
            0 1056   64
            1  201  179
> ## How do you persist the model in the DB
> ##     Rename and save the model in the database
> dtModel$name
 [1] "ORE$208_210"

> ## Save the ODM model in the in-database R datastore
> ore.save(dtModel, name = "ORE_MODELS", overwrite=TRUE)
> ore.load(name = "ORE_MODELS")
 [1] "dtModel"

> ## Score new data using the DM Model
> ore.sync(table = c("MINING_DATA_APPLY"))
> ore.ls()
 [1] "DEMO_R_APPLY_RESULT"   "DEMO_R_TABLE"          "DEMO_SUBSET_TABLE"    
 [4] "INSUR_CUST_LTV_SAMPLE" "MINING_DATA_APPLY"     "MINING_DATA_BUILD_V"  
 [7] "MINING_DATA_TEST_V"   > dtApply  dim(dtApply)
 [1] 1500   18
> class(dtApply)
 [1] "ore.frame”
 attr(,"package")
 [1] "OREbase”
> DTAPPLY  dtApplyResult  dtApplyResult  head(dtApplyResult)
             '0'        '1' PREDICTION
100001 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100002 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100003 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100004 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
100005 0.2633745 0.73662551          1
100006 0.9521912 0.04780876          0
> dim(dtApplyResult)
 [1] 1500    3
> dim(dtApply)
 [1] 1500   18
> dtResults  dim(dtResults)
 [1] 1500   21
> ore.drop(table = "DEMO_R_APPLY_RESULT")
> ore.create(dtApplyResult, table="DEMO_R_APPLY_RESULT")
> ## Run the following for the first time you will rename a mode
> # ore.exec(paste("BEGIN> 
  #                  DBMS_DATA_MINING.RENAME_MODEL(model_name => '", dtModel$name, "',> 
  #                      new_model_name => 'DEMO_R_DT_MODEL'); END;",sep=""))> 
  ## Run the following to refresh an existing model
> ore.exec(paste("BEGIN
+ DBMS_DATA_MINING.DROP_MODEL('DEMO_R_DT_MODEL');
+ DBMS_DATA_MINING.RENAME_MODEL(model_name => '", dtModel$name,"',
+ new_model_name => 'DEMO_R_DT_MODEL');
+ END;",sep=""))

Running R in the Oracle Database video

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Earlier this year I was asked by the Business Analysics & Big Data SIG (of the UKOUG) to give a presentation on Oracle R Enterprise. Unfortunately I had already committed to giving the same presentation at the OUG Norway conference on the same day.

But then they asked me if I could record a video of the presentation and they would show it at the SIG. The following video is what I recorded.

At the UKOUG annual (2015) conferences I was supposed to give a 2 hour presentation during their Super Sunday event. Unfortunately due to a storm passing over Ireland on the Saturday all flights going to the UK were cancelled. This meant that I would miss my 2 hour presentation.

Instead of trying to find an alternative speaker for my presentation slot at such sort notice, the committee suggested that they would show the video.

Based on the feedback and the people who thanked me in person during the rest of the conference, I’ve decided to make it available to everyone. Hopefully you will find it useful.

The following are the links to the demo code that is shown or referred to in the video.

People have been asking me if the demo scripts I used in video are available. You will probably find some of these on various blog posts. So to make it easier for everyone I will post the demo scripts in one or more blog posts over the coming weeks. When these are available I will update this blog post with the links.

I have a few new presentations on Oracle R Enterprise in 2016 so watch out for these at an Oracle User Group conference.