oracle data mining

Using the Identity column for Oracle Data Miner

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If you are a user of the Oracle Data Miner tool (the workflow data mining tool that is part of SQL Developer), then you will have noticed that for many of the algorithms you can specify a Case Id attribute along with, say, the target attribute.

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The idea is that you have one attribute that is a unique identifier for each case record. This may or may not be the case in your data model and you may have a multiple attribute primary key or case record identifier.

But what is the Case Id field used for in Oracle Data Miner?

Based on the documentation this field does not need to have a value. But it is recommended that you do identify an attribute for the Case Id, as this will allow for reproducible results. What this means is that if we run our workflow today and again in a few days time, on the exact same data, we should get the same results. So the Case Id allows this to happen. But how? Well it looks like the attribute used or specified for the Case Id is used as part of the Hashing algorithm to partition the data into a train and test data set, for classification problems.

So if you don’t have a single attribute case identifier in your data set, then you need to create one. There are a few options open to you to do this.

  • Create one: write some code that will generate a unique identifier for each of your case records based on some defined rule.
  • Use a sequence: and update the records to use this sequence.
  • Use ROWID: use the unique row identifier value. You can write some code to populate this value into an attribute. Or create a view on the table containing the case records and add a new attribute that will use the ROWID. But if you move the data, then the next time you use the view then you will be getting different ROWIDs and that in turn will mean we may have different case records going into our test and training data sets. So our workflows will generate different results. Not what we want.
  • Use ROWNUM: This is kind of like using the ROWID. Again we can have a view that will select ROWNUM for each record. Again we may have the same issues but if we have our data ordered in a way that ensures we get the records returned in the same order then this approach is OK to use.
  • Use Identity Column: In Oracle 12c we have a new feature called Identify Column. This kind of acts like a sequence but we can defined an attribute in a table to be an Identity Column, and as records are inserted into the the data (in our scenario our case table) then this column will automatically generate a unique number for our data. Again if we need to repopulate the case table, you will need to drop and recreate the table to get the Identity Column to reset, otherwise the newly inserted records will start with the next number of the Identity Column

Here is an example of using the Identity Column in a case table.

CREATE TABLE case_table (
id_column	NUMBER GENERATED ALWAYS AS IDENTITY,
affinity_card 	NUMBER,
age		NUMBER,
cust_gender	VARCHAR2(5),
country_name	VARCHAR2(20)
...
);

You can now use this Identity Column as the Case Id in your Oracle Data Miner workflows.

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Oracle Text, Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Data Mining – Part 5

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In this 5th blog post in my series on using the capabilities of Oracle Text, Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Data Mining to process documents and text, I will have a look at some of the machine learning features of Oracle Text.

Oracle Text comes with a number of machine learning algorithms. These can be divided into two types. The first is called ‘Supervised Learning’ where we have two machine learning algorithms for classification type of problem. The second type is called ‘Unsupervised Learning’ where we have the ability to use clustering machine learning algorithms to look for patterns in our text documents and to find similarities between documents based on their contents.

It is this second type of document clustering that I will work through in this blog post.

When using clustering with text documents, the machine learning algorithm will look for patterns that are common between the documents. These patterns will include the words used, the frequency of the words, the position or ordering of these words, the co-occurance of words, etc. Yes this is a large an complex task and that is why we need a machine learning algorithm to help us.

With Oracle Text we only have one clustering machine learning algorithm available to use. When we move onto using the Oracle Advanced Analytics Option (Oracle Data Mining and Oracle R Enterprise) we more algorithms available to us.

With Oracle Text the clustering algorithm is called k-Means. In a way the actual algorithm is unimportant as it is the only one available to us when using Oracle Text. To use this algorithm we have the CTX_CLS.CLUSTERING procedure. This procedure takes the documents we want to compare and will then identify the clusters (using hierarchical clustering) and will then tells us, for each document, what clusters the documents belong to and they probability value. With clustering a document (or a record) can belong to many clusters. Typically in the text books we see clusters that are very distinct and are clearly separated from each other. When you work on real data this is never the case. We will have many over lapping clusters and a data point/record can belong to one or more clusters. This is why we need the probability vale. We can use this to determine what cluster our record belongs to most and what other clusters it is associated with.

Using the example documents that I have been using during this series of blog posts we can use the CTX_CLS.CLUSTERING algorithm to cluster and identify similarities in these documents.

We need to setup the parameters that will be used by the CTX_CLS.CLUSTERING procedure. Tell it to use the k-Means algorithm and then the number of clusters to generate. As with all Oracle Text procedures or algorithms there are a number of settings you can configure or you can just accept the default values.

exec ctx_ddl.drop_preference('Cluster_My_Documents');
exec ctx_ddl.create_preference('Cluster_My_Documents','KMEAN_CLUSTERING');
exec ctx_ddl.set_attribute('Cluster_My_Documents','CLUSTER_NUM','3');

The code above is an example of the basics of what you need to setup for clustering. Other attribute or cluster parameter setting available to you include, MAX_DOCTERMS, MAX_FEATURES, THEME_ON, TOKEN_ON, STEM_ON, MEMORY_SIZE and SECTION_WEIGHT.

Now we can run the CTX_CLS.CLUSTERING procedure on our documents. This procedure has the following parameters.

– The Oracle Text Index Name

– Document Id Column Name

– Document Assignment (cluster assignment) Table Name. This table will be created if it doesn’t already exist

– Cluster Description Table Name. This table will be created if it doesn’t already exist.

– Name of the Oracle Text Preference (list)

exec ctx_cls.clustering(
'MY_DOCUMENTS_OT_IDX',
'DOC_PK',
'OT_CLUSTER_RESULTS',
'DOC_CLUSTER_DETAILS',
'Cluster_My_Documents');

When the procedure has completed we can now examine the OT_CLUSTER_RESULTS and the DOC_CLUSTER_DETAILS tables. The first of these (OT_CLUSTER_RESULTS) allows us to see what documents have been clustered together. The following is what was produced for my documents.

SELECT d.doc_pk, 
       d.doc_title, 
       r.clusterid, 
       r.score 
FROM my_documents d, 
     ot_cluster_results r 
WHERE d.doc_pk = r.docid;

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We can see that two of the documents have been grouped into the same cluster (ClusterId=2). If you have a look back at what these documents are about then you can see that yes these are very similar. For the other two documents we can see that they have been clustered into separate clusters (ClusterId=4 & 5). The clustering algorithms have said that they are different types of documents. Again when you examine these documents you will see that they are talking about different topics. So the clustering process worked !

You can also explore the various features of the clusters by looking that he DOC_CLUSTER_DETAILS table. Although the details in this table are not overly useful but it will give you some insight into what clusters the k-Means algorithm has produced.

Hopefully I’ve shown you how easy it is to setup and use the clustering feature of Oracle Text.

WARNING: Before using the Clustering or Classification with Oracle Text, you need to check with your local Oracle Sales representative about if there is licence implication. There seems to be some mentions the the algorithms used are those that come with Oracle Data Mining. Oracle Data Mining is a licence cost option for the database. So make sure you check before you go using these features.

Oracle Text, Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Data Mining – Part 1

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A project that I’ve been working on for a while now involves the use of Oracle Text, Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Data Mining. Oracle Text comes with your Oracle Database licence. Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Data Mining are part of the Oracle Advanced Analytics (extra cost) option.

What I will be doing over the course of 4 or maybe 5 blog posts is how these products can work together to help you gain a grater insight into your data, and part of your data being large text items like free format text, documents (in various forms e.g. html, xml, pdf, ms word), etc.

Unfortunately I cannot show you examples from the actual project I’ve been working on (and still am, from time to time). But what I can do is to show you how products and components can work together.

In this blog post I will just do some data setup. As with all project scenarios there can be many ways of performing the same tasks. Some might be better than others. But what I will be showing you is for demonstration purposes.

The scenario: The scenario for this blog post is that I want to extract text from some webpages and store them in a table in my schema. I then want to use Oracle Text to search the text from these webpages.

Schema setup: We need to create a table that will store the text from the webpages. We also want to create an Oracle Text index so that this text is searchable.

drop sequence my_doc_seq;
create sequence my_doc_seq;

drop table my_documents;

create table my_documents (
doc_pk number(10) primary key, 
doc_title varchar2(100), 
doc_extracted date, 
data_source varchar2(200), 
doc_text clob);

create index my_documents_ot_idx on my_documents(doc_text) 
indextype is CTXSYS.CONTEXT;

In the table we have a number of descriptive attributes and then a club for storing the website text. We will only be storing the website text and not the html document (More on that later). In order to make the website text searchable in the DOC_TEXT attribute we need to create an Oracle Text index of type CONTEXT.

There are a few challenges with using this type of index. For example when you insert a new record or update the DOC_TEXT attribute, the new values/text will not be reflected instantly, just like we are use to with traditional indexes. Instead you have to decide when you want to index to be updated. For example, if you would like the index to be updated after each commit then you can create the index using the following.

create index my_documents_ot_idx on my_documents(doc_text) 
indextype is CTXSYS.CONTEXT
parameters ('sync (on commit)');

Depending on the number of documents you have being committed to the DB, this might not be for you. You need to find the balance. Alternatively you could schedule the index to be updated by passing an interval to the ‘sync’ in the above command. Alternatively you might want to use DBMS_JOB to schedule the update.

To manually sync (or via DBMS_JOB) the index, assuming we used the first ‘create index’ statement, we would need to run the following.

EXEC CTX_DDL.SYNC_INDEX('my_documents_ot_idx');

This function just adds the new documents to the index. This can, over time, lead to some fragmentation of the index, and will require it to the re-organised on a semi-regular basis. Perhaps you can schedule this to happen every night, or once a week, or whatever makes sense to you.

BEGIN
  CTX_DDL.OPTIMIZE_INDEX('my_documents_ot_idx','FULL');
END;

(I could talk a lot more about setting up some basics of Oracle Text, the indexes, etc. But I’ll leave that for another day or you can read some of the many blog posts that already exist on the topic.)

Extracting text from a webpage using R: Some time ago I wrote a blog post on using some of the text mining features and packages in R to produce a word cloud based on some of the Oracle Advanced Analytics webpages.

I’m going to use the same webpages and some of the same code/functions/packages here.

The first task you need to do is to get your hands on the ‘htmlToText function. You can download the htmlToText function on github. This function requires the ‘Curl’ and ‘XML’ R packages. So you may need to install these.

I also use the str_replace_all function (“stringer’ R package) to remove some of the html that remains, to remove some special quotes and to replace and occurrences of ‘&’ with ‘and’.

# Load the function and required R packages
source(“c:/app/htmltotext.R”)
library(stringr)

data1 <- str_replace_all(htmlToText("http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/options/advanced-analytics/overview/index.html"), "[\r\n\t\"\'\u201C\u201D]" , "")
data1 <- str_replace_all(data1, "&", "and")
data2 <- str_replace_all(str_replace_all(htmlToText("http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/options/advanced-analytics/odm/index.html"), "[\r\n\t\"\'\u201C\u201D]" , ""), "&", "and")
data2 <- str_replace_all(data2, "&", "and")
data3 <- str_replace_all(str_replace_all(htmlToText("http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-technologies/r/r-technologies/overview/index.html"), "[\r\n\t\"\'\u201C\u201D]" , ""), "&", "and")
data3 <- str_replace_all(data3, "&", "and")
data4 <- str_replace_all(str_replace_all(htmlToText("http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-technologies/r/r-enterprise/overview/index.html"), "[\r\n\t\"\'\u201C\u201D]" , ""), "&", "and")
data4 <- str_replace_all(data4, "&", "and")

We now have the text extracted and cleaned up.

Create a data frame to contain all our data: Now that we have the text extracted, we can prepare the other data items we need to insert the data into our table (‘my_documents’). The first stept is to construct a data frame to contain all the data.

data_source = c("http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/options/advanced-analytics/overview/index.html",
                 "http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/options/advanced-analytics/odm/index.html",
                 "http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-technologies/r/r-technologies/overview/index.html",
                 "http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-technologies/r/r-enterprise/overview/index.html")
doc_title = c("OAA_OVERVIEW", "OAA_ODM", "R_TECHNOLOGIES", "OAA_ORE")
doc_extracted = Sys.Date()
data_text <- c(data1, data2, data3, data4)

my_docs <- data.frame(doc_title, doc_extracted, data_source, data_text)

Insert the data into our database table: With the data in our data fram (my_docs) we can now use this data to insert into our database table. There are a number of ways of doing this in R. What I’m going to show you here is how to do it using Oracle R Enterprise (ORE). The thing with ORE is that there is no explicit functionality for inserting and updating records in a database table. What you need to do is to construct, in my case, the insert statement and then use ore.exec to execute this statement in the database.

PMML in Oracle Data Mining

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PMML (Predictive Model Markup Langauge) is an XML formatted output that defines the core elements and settings for your Predictive Models. This XML formatted output can be used to migrate your models from one data mining or predictive modelling tool to another data mining or predictive modelling tool, such as Oracle.

Using PMML to migrate your models from one tool to another allows for you to use the most appropriate tools for developing your models and then allows them to be imported into another tool that will be used for deploying your predictive models in batch or real-time mode. In particular the ability to use your Predictive Model within your everyday applications enables you to work in the area of Automatic or Prescriptive Analytics. Oracle Data Mining and the Oracle Database are ideal or even the best possible tools to allow for Automatic and Prescriptive Analytics for your transa

PMML is an XML based standard specified by the Data Mining Group

Oracle Data Mining supports the importing of PMML models that are compliant with version 3.1 of the standard and for Regression Models only. The regression models can be for linear regression or binary logistic regression.

The Data Mining Group Archive webpage have a number of sample PMML files for you to download and then to load into your Oracle database.

To Load the PMML file into your Oracle Database you can use the DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL function. I’ve given examples of how you can use this function to import an Oracle Data Mining model that was exported using the EXPORT_MODEL function.

The syntax of the IMPORT_MODEL function when importing a PMML file is the following

DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL (
      model_name        IN  VARCHAR2,
      pmmldoc           IN  XMLTYPE
      strict_check      IN  BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE);

The following example shows how you can load the version 3.1 Logistic Regression PMML file from the Data Mining Group archive webpage

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BEGIN    
   dbms_data_mining.IMPORT_MODEL (‘PMML_MODEL',
        XMLType (bfilename (‘IMPORT_DIR', 'sas_3.1_iris_logistic_reg.xml'),
          nls_charset_id ('AL32UTF8')
        ));
END;

 

This example uses the default value for STRICT_CHECK as FALASE. In this case if there are any errors in the PMML structure then these will be ignored and the imported model may contain “features” that may make it perform in a slightly odd manner.

PMML in Oracle Data Mining

Posted on Updated on

PMML (Predictive Model Markup Langauge) is an XML formatted output that defines the core elements and settings for your Predictive Models. This XML formatted output can be used to migrate your models from one data mining or predictive modelling tool to another data mining or predictive modelling tool, such as Oracle.

Using PMML to migrate your models from one tool to another allows for you to use the most appropriate tools for developing your models and then allows them to be imported into another tool that will be used for deploying your predictive models in batch or real-time mode. In particular the ability to use your Predictive Model within your everyday applications enables you to work in the area of Automatic or Prescriptive Analytics. Oracle Data Mining and the Oracle Database are ideal or even the best possible tools to allow for Automatic and Prescriptive Analytics for your transa

PMML is an XML based standard specified by the Data Mining Group

Oracle Data Mining supports the importing of PMML models that are compliant with version 3.1 of the standard and for Regression Models only. The regression models can be for linear regression or binary logistic regression.

The Data Mining Group Archive webpage have a number of sample PMML files for you to download and then to load into your Oracle database.

To Load the PMML file into your Oracle Database you can use the DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL function. I’ve given examples of how you can use this function to import an Oracle Data Mining model that was exported using the EXPORT_MODEL function.

The syntax of the IMPORT_MODEL function when importing a PMML file is the following

DBMS_DATA_MINING.IMPORT_MODEL (
      model_name        IN  VARCHAR2,
      pmmldoc           IN  XMLTYPE
      strict_check      IN  BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE);

The following example shows how you can load the version 3.1 Logistic Regression PMML file from the Data Mining Group archive webpage

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BEGIN    
   dbms_data_mining.IMPORT_MODEL (‘PMML_MODEL',
        XMLType (bfilename (‘IMPORT_DIR', 'sas_3.1_iris_logistic_reg.xml'),
          nls_charset_id ('AL32UTF8')
        ));
END;

 

This example uses the default value for STRICT_CHECK as FALASE. In this case if there are any errors in the PMML structure then these will be ignored and the imported model may contain “features” that may make it perform in a slightly odd manner.

Oracle Data Miner (ODM 4.1) New Features

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With the release of SQL Developer 4.1 we also get a number of new features with Oracle Data Miner (ODMr). These include:

  • Data Source node can now include data sources that contain JSON data, generating JSON schema and has a JSON viewer
  • Create Table can now create data in JSON
  • JSON Query Node allows you to view, query and process JSON data, combine it with relational data, generate sub-group by, and nested columns to be part of input to algorithms
  • New PL/SQL APIs for managing Data Miner projects and workflows. This includes run, cancel, rename, delete, import and export of workflows using PL/SQL.
  • New ODMr Repository views that allows us to query and monitor our workflows.
  • Transformation Node now allows you different ways of handling NULLS.
  • Transformation Node now allows us to create Custom Bins, define bin labels and bin values
  • Overall Workflow and ODMr environment improvements to allow for greater efficiency in workflow behaviour and interactions with the database. So using ODMr should feel quicker and more responsive.

What out for the Gotchas: Although support for JSON has been added to ODMr, as outlined above, you are still a bit limited to what else you can do with your JSON data. Based on the documentation you can use JSON data in the Association and Classification build nodes.

I’m not sure about the other nodes and this will need a bit of investigation to see what nodes can and cannot use JSON data. I’m sure this will all be sorted out in the next release.

Keep an eye out for some blog posts over the coming weeks on how to explore and use these new features of Oracle Data Miner.

Viewing Models Details for Decision Trees using SQL

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When you are working with and developing Decision Trees by far the easiest way to visualise these is by using the Oracle Data Miner (ODMr) tool that is part of SQL Developer.
Developing your Decision Tree models using the ODMr allows you to explore the decision tree produced, to drill in on each of the nodes of the tree and to see all the statistics etc that relate to each node and branch of the tree.
But when you are working with the DBMS_DATA_MINING PL/SQL package and with the SQL commands for Oracle Data Mining you don’t have the same luxury of the graphical tool that we have in ODMr. For example here is an image of part of a Decision Tree I have and was developed using ODMr.
Blog dt 1
What if we are not using the ODMr tool? In that case you will be using SQL and PL/SQL. When using these you do not have luxury of viewing the Decision Tree.
So what can you see of the Decision Tree? Most of the model details can be used by a variety of functions that can apply the model to your data. I’ve covered many of these over the years on this blog.
For most of the data mining algorithms there is a PL/SQL function available in the DBMS_DATA_MINING package that allows you to see inside the models to find out the settings, rules, etc. Most of these packages have a name something like GET_MODEL_DETAILS_XXXX, where XXXX is the name of the algorithm. For example GET_MODEL_DETAILS_NB will get the details of a Naive Bayes model. But when you look through the list there doesn’t seem to be one for Decision Trees.
Actually there is and it is called GET_MODEL_DETAILS_XML. This function takes one parameter, the name of the Decision Tree model and produces an XML formatted output that contains the attributes used by the model, the overall model settings, then for each node and branch the attributes and the values used and the other statistical measures required for each node/branch.
The following SQL uses this PL/SQL function to get the Decision Tree details for model called CLAS_DT_1_59.
SELECT dbms_data_mining.get_model_details_xml(‘CLAS_DT_1_59’)
FROM dual;

If you are using SQL Developer you will need to double click on the output column and click on the pencil icon to view the full listing.
Blog dt 2
Nothing too fancy like what we get in ODMr, but it is something that we can work with.
If you examine the XML output you will see references to PMML. This refers to the Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML) and this is defined by the Data Mining Group (www.dmg.org). I will discuss the PMML in another blog post and how you can use it with Oracle Data Mining.