ATP

Python-Connecting to multiple Oracle Autonomous DBs in one program

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More and more people are using the FREE Oracle Autonomous Database for building new new applications, or are migrating to it.

I’ve previously written about connecting to an Oracle Database using Python. Check out that post for details of how to setup Oracle Client and the Oracle Python library cx_Oracle.

In thatblog post I gave examples of connecting to an Oracle Database using the HostName (or IP address), the Service Name or the SID.

But with the Autonomous Oracle Database things are a little bit different. With the Autonomous Oracle Database (ADW or ATP) you will need to use an Oracle Wallet file. This file contains some of the connection details, but you don’t have access to ServiceName/SID, HostName, etc.  Instead you have the name of the Autonomous Database. The Wallet is used to create a secure connection to the Autonomous Database.

You can download the Wallet file from the Database console on Oracle Cloud.

Screenshot 2020-01-10 12.24.10

Most people end up working with multiple database. Sometimes these can be combined into one TNSNAMES file. This can make things simple and easy. To use the download TNSNAME file you will need to set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable. This will allow Python and cx_Oracle library to automatically pick up this file and you can connect to the ATP/ADW Database.

But most people don’t work with just a single database or use a single TNSNAMES file. In most cases you need to switch between different database connections and hence need to use multiple TNSNAMES files.

The question is how can you switch between ATP/ADW Database using different TNSNAMES files while inside one Python program?

Use the os.environ setting in Python. This allows you to reassign the TNS_ADMIN environment variable to point to a new directory containing the TNSNAMES file. This is a temporary assignment and over rides the TNS_ADMIN environment variable.

For example,

import cx_Oracle
import os

os.environ['TNS_ADMIN'] = "/Users/brendan.tierney/Dropbox/wallet_ATP"

p_username = ''p_password = ''p_service = 'atp_high'
con = cx_Oracle.connect(p_username, p_password, p_service)

print(con)
print(con.version)
con.close()

I can now easily switch to another ATP/ADW Database, in the same Python program, by changing the value of os.environ and opening a new connection.

import cx_Oracle
import os

os.environ['TNS_ADMIN'] = "/Users/brendan.tierney/Dropbox/wallet_ATP"
p_username = ''
p_password = ''
p_service = 'atp_high'
con1 = cx_Oracle.connect(p_username, p_password, p_service)
...
con1.close()

...
os.environ['TNS_ADMIN'] = "/Users/brendan.tierney/Dropbox/wallet_ADW2"
p_username = ''
p_password = ''
p_service = 'ADW2_high'
con2 = cx_Oracle.connect(p_username, p_password, p_service)
...
con2.close()

As mentioned previously the setting and resetting of TNS_ADMIN using os.environ, is only temporary, and when your Python program exists or completes the original value for this environment variable will remain.

OML Workspace Permissions

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When working with Oracle Machine Learning (OML) you are creating notebooks which focus on a particular data exploration and possibly some machine learning. Despite it’s name, OML is used extensively for data discovery and data exploration.

One of the aims of using OML, or notebooks in general, is that these can be easily shared with other people either within the same team or beyond. Something to consider when sharing notebooks is what you are allowing other people do with your notebook. Without any permissions you are allowing people to inspect, run and modify the notebooks. This can be a problem because those people you are sharing with may or may not be allowed to make modification. Some people should be able to just view the notebook, and others should be able to more advanced tasks.

With OML Notebooks there are four primary types of people who can access Notebooks and these can have different privileges. These are defined as

  • Developer : Can create new notebooks withing a project and workspace but cannot create a workspace or a project. Can create and run a notebook as a scheduled job.
  • Viewer : They can just view projects, Workspaces and notebooks. They are not allowed to create or run anything.
  • Manager : can create new notebooks and projects. But only view Workspaces. Additionally they can schedule notebook jobs.
  • Administrators : Administrators of the OML environment do not have any edit capabilities on notebooks. But they can view them.

Screenshot 2019-09-14 05.24.18

Screenshot 2019-09-14 10.40.23

OML Notebooks Interpreter Bindings

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When using Oracle Machine Learning notebooks, you can export and import these between different projects and different environments (from ADW to ATP).

But something to watch out for when you import a notebook into your ADW or ATP environment is to reset the Interpreter Bindings.

When you create a new OML Notebook and build it up, the various Interpreter Bindings are automatically set or turned on. But for Imported OML Notebooks they are not turned on.

I’m assuming this will be fixed at some future point.

If you import an OML Notebook and turn on the Interpreter Bindings you may find the code in your notebook cells running very slowly

To turn on these binding, click on the options icon as indicated by the red box in the following image.

Screenshot 2019-08-19 21.04.58

You will get something like the following being displayed. None of the bindings are highlighted.

Screenshot 2019-08-19 21.08.03

To enable the Interpreter Bindings just click on each of these boxes. When you do this each one will be highlighted and will turn a blue color.

Screenshot 2019-08-19 21.07.20

All done!  You can now run your OML Notebooks without any problems or delays.