SQL

Creating ggplot2 graphics using SQL

Posted on

Did you read the title of this blog post! Read it again.

Yes, Yes, I know what you are saying, “SQL cannot produce graphics or charts and particularly not ggplot2 graphics”.

You are correct to a certain extent. SQL is rubbish a creating graphics (and I’m being polite).

But with Oracle R Enterprise you can now produce graphics on your data using the embedded R execution feature of Oracle R Enterprise using SQL. In this blog post I will show you how.

1. Pre-requisites

You need to have installed Oracle R Enterprise on your Oracle Database Server. Plus you need to install the ggplot2 R package.

In your R session you will need to setup a ORE connection to your Oracle schema.

2. Write and Test your R code to produce the graphic

It is always a good idea to write and test your R code before you go near using it in a user defined function.

For our (first) example we are going to create a bar chart using the ggplot2 R package. This is a basic example and the aim is to illustrate the steps you need to go through to call and produce this graphic using SQL.

The following code using the CLAIMS data set that is available with/for Oracle Advanced Analytics. The first step is to pull the data from the table in your Oracle schema to your R session. This is because ggplot2 cannot work with data referenced by an ore.frame object.

data.subset <- ore.pull(CLAIMS) 

Next we need to aggregate the data. Here we are counting the number of records for each Make of car.

aggdata2 <- aggregate(data.subset$POLICYNUMBER,
                      by = list(MAKE = data.subset$MAKE),
                      FUN = length)

Now load the ggplot2 R package and use it to build the bar chart.

ggplot(data=aggdata2, aes(x=MAKE, y=x, fill=MAKE)) + 
       geom_bar(color="black", stat="identity") +
       xlab("Make of Car") + 
       ylab("Num of Accidents") + 
       ggtitle("Accidents by Make of Car")

The following is the graphic that our call to ggplot2 produces in R.

NewImage

At this point we have written and tested our R code and know that it works.

3. Create a user defined R function and store it in the Oracle Database

Our next step in the process is to create an in-database user defined R function. This is were we store R code in our Oracle Database and make this available as an R function. To create the user defined R function we can use some PL/SQL to define it, and then take our R code (see above) and in it.

BEGIN
   -- sys.rqScriptDrop('demo_ggpplot');
   sys.rqScriptCreate('demo_ggpplot', 
      'function(dat) {
         library(ggplot2)
         
         aggdata2 <- aggregate(dat$POLICYNUMBER,
                      by = list(MAKE = dat$MAKE),
                      FUN = length)

        g <-ggplot(data=aggdata2, aes(x=MAKE, y=x, fill=MAKE)) + geom_bar(color="black", stat="identity") +
                   xlab("Make of Car") + ylab("Num of Accidents") + ggtitle("Accidents by Make of Car")

        plot(g)
   }');
END;

We have to make a small addition to our R code. We need need to include a call to the plot function so that the image can be returned as a BLOB object. If you do not do this then the SQL query in step 4 will return no rows.

4. Write the SQL to call it

To call our defined R function we will need to use one of the ORE SQL API functions. In the following example we are using the rqTableEval function. The first parameter for this function passes in the data to be processed. In our case this is the data from the CLAIMS table. The second parameter is set to null. The third parameter is set to the output format and in our case we want this to be PNG. The fourth parameter is the name of the user defined R function.

select *
from table(rqTableEval( cursor(select * from claims),
                        null,
                        'PNG',
                        'demo_ggpplot'));                        

5. How to view the results

The SQL query in Step 4 above will return one row and this row will contain a column with a BLOB data type.

NewImage

The easiest way to view the graphic that is produced is to use SQL Developer. It has an inbuilt feature that allows you to display BLOB objects. All you need to do is to double click on the BLOB cell (under the column labeled IMAGE). A window will open called ‘View Value’. In this window click the ‘View As Image’ check box on the top right hand corner of the window. When you do the R ggplot2 graphic will be displayed.

NewImage

Yes the image is not 100% the same as the image produced in our R session. I will have another blog post that deals with this at a later date.

But, now you have written a SQL query, that calls R code to produce an R graphic (using ggplot2) of our data.

6. Now you can enhance the graphics (without changing your SQL)

What if you get bored with the bar chart and you want to change it to a different type of graphic? All you need to do is to change the relevant code in the user defined R function.

For example, if we want to change the graphic to a polar plot. The following is the PL/SQL code that re-defines the user defined R script.

BEGIN
   sys.rqScriptDrop('demo_ggpplot');
   sys.rqScriptCreate('demo_ggpplot', 
      'function(dat) {
         library(ggplot2)
         
         aggdata2 <- aggregate(dat$POLICYNUMBER,
                      by = list(MAKE = dat$MAKE),
                      FUN = length)

         n <- nrow(aggdata2)
         degrees <- 360/n

        aggdata2$MAKE_ID <- 1:nrow(aggdata2)

        g<- ggplot(data=aggdata2, aes(x=MAKE, y=x, fill=MAKE)) + geom_bar(color="black", stat="identity") +
               xlab("Make of Car") + ylab("Num of Accidents") + ggtitle("Accidents by Make of Car") + coord_polar(theta="x") 
        plot(g)
   }');
END;

We can use the exact same SQL query we defined in Step 4 above to call the next graphic.

NewImage

All done.

Now that was easy! Right?

I kind of is easy once you have been shown. There are a few challenges when working in-database user defined R functions and writing the SQL to call them. Most of the challenges are around the formatting of R code in the function and the syntax of the SQL statement to call it. With a bit of practice it does get easier.

7. Where/How can you use these graphics ?

Any application or program that can call and process a BLOB data type can display these images. For example, I’ve been able to include these graphics in applications developed in APEX.

PREDICTION_DETAILS function in Oracle

Posted on

When building predictive models the data scientist can spend a large amount of time examining the models produced and how they work and perform on their hold out sample data sets. They do this to understand is the model gives a good general representation of the data and can identify/predict many different scenarios. When the “best” model has been selected then this is typically deployed is some sort of reporting environment, where a list is produced. This is typical deployment method but is far from being ideal. A more ideal deployment method is that the predictive models are build into the everyday applications that the company uses. For example, it is build into the call centre application, so that the staff have live and real-time feedback and predictions as they are talking to the customer.

But what kind of live and real-time feedback and predictions are possible. Again if we look at what is traditionally done in these applications they will get a predicted outcome (will they be a good customer or a bad customer) or some indication of their value (maybe lifetime value, possible claim payout value) etc.

But can we get anymore information? Information like what was reason for the prediction. This is sometimes called prediction insight. Can we get some details of what the prediction model used to decide on the predicted value. In more predictive analytics products this is not possible, as all you are told is the final out come.

What would be useful is to know some of the thinking that the predictive model used to make its thinking. The reasons when one customer may be a “bad customer” might be different to that of another customer. Knowing this kind of information can be very useful to the staff who are dealing with the customers. For those who design the workflows etc can then build more advanced workflows to support the staff when dealing with the customers.

Oracle as a unique feature that allows us to see some of the details that the prediction model used to make the prediction. This functions (based on using the Oracle Advanced Analytics option and Oracle Data Mining to build your predictive model) is called PREDICTION_DETAILS.

When you go to use PREDICTION_DETAILS you need to be careful as it will work differently in the 11.2g and 12c versions of the Oracle Database (Enterprise Editions). In Oracle Database 11.2g the PREDICTION_DETAILS function would only work for Decision Tree models. But in 12c (and above) it has been opened to include details for models created using all the classification algorithms, all the regression algorithms and also for anomaly detection.

The following gives an example of using the PREDICTION_DETAILS function.

select cust_id, 
       prediction(clas_svm_1_27 using *) pred_value,
       prediction_probability(clas_svm_1_27 using *) pred_prob,
       prediction_details(clas_svm_1_27 using *) pred_details
from mining_data_apply_v;

The PREDICTION_DETAILS function produces its output in XML, and this consists of the attributes used and their values that determined why a record had the predicted value. The following gives some examples of the XML produced for some of the records.

NewImage

I’ve used this particular function in lots of my projects and particularly when building the applications for a particular business unit. Oracle too has build this functionality into many of their applications. The images below are from the HCM application where you can examine the details why an employee may or may not leave/churn. You can when perform real-time what-if analysis by changing some of attribute values to see if the predicted out come changes.

NewImage