Machine Learning

GoLang – Consuming Oracle REST API from an Oracle Cloud Database)

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Does anyone write code to access data in a database anymore, and by code I mean SQL?  The answer to this question is ‘It Depends’, just like everything in IT.

Using REST APIs is very common for accessing processing data with a Database. From using an API to retrieve data, to using a slightly different API to insert data, and using other typical REST functions to perform your typical CRUD operations. Using REST APIs allows developers to focus on write efficient applications in a particular application, instead of having to swap between their programming language and SQL. In later cases most developers are not expert SQL developer or know how to work efficiently with the data. Therefore leave the SQL and procedural coding to those who are good at that, and then expose the data and their code via REST APIs. The end result is efficient SQL and Database coding, and efficient application coding. This is a win-win for everyone.

I’ve written before about creating REST APIs in an Oracle Cloud Database (DBaaS and Autonomous). In these writings I’ve shown how to use the in-database machine learning features and to use REST APIs to create an interface to the Machine Learning models. These models can be used to to score new data, making a machine learning prediction. The data being used for the prediction doesn’t have to exist in the database, instead the database is being used as a machine learning scoring engine, accessed using a REST API.

Check out an article I wrote about this and creating a REST API for an in-database machine learning model, for Oracle Magazine.

In that article I showed how easy it was to use the in-database machine model using Python.

Python has a huge fan and user base, but some of the challenges with Python is with performance, as it is an interrupted language. Don’t get be wrong on this, as lots of work has gone into making Python more efficient. But in some scenarios it just isn’t fast enough. In does scenarios people will switch into using other quicker to execute languages such as C, C++, Java and GoLang.

Here is the GoLang code to call the in-database machine learning model and process the returned data.

import (
    "bytes"
    "encoding/json"
    "fmt"
    "io/ioutil"
    "net/http"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println("---------------------------------------------------")
    fmt.Println("Starting Demo - Calling Oracle in-database ML Model")
    fmt.Println("")

    // Define variables for REST API and parameter for first prediction
    rest_api = "<full REST API>"

    // This wine is Bad
    a_country := "Portugal"
    a_province := "Douro"
    a_variety := "Portuguese Red"
    a_price := "30"

    // call the REST API adding in the parameters
    response, err := http.Get(rest_api +"/"+ a_country +"/"+ a_province +"/"+ a_variety +"/"+ a_price)
    if err != nil {
        // an error has occurred. Exit
        fmt.Printf("The HTTP request failed with error :: %s\n", err)
        os.Exit(1)
    } else {
        // we got data! Now extract it and print to screen
        responseData, _ := ioutil.ReadAll(response.Body)
        fmt.Println(string(responseData))
    }
    response.Body.Close()

    // Lets do call it again with a different set of parameters

    // This wine is Good - same details except the price is different
    a_price := "31"

    // call the REST API adding in the parameters
    response, err := http.Get(rest_api +"/"+ a_country +"/"+ a_province +"/"+ a_variety +"/"+ a_price)
    if err != nil {
        // an error has occurred. Exit
        fmt.Printf("The HTTP request failed with error :: %s\n", err)
        os.Exit(1)
    } else {
        responseData, _ := ioutil.ReadAll(response.Body)
        fmt.Println(string(responseData))
    }
    defer response.Body.Close()

    // All done! 
    fmt.Println("")
    fmt.Println("...Finished Demo ...")
    fmt.Println("---------------------------------------------------")
}

 

XGBoost in Oracle 20c

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Another of the new machine learning algorithms in Oracle 20c Database is called XGBoost. Most people will have come across this algorithm due to its recent popularity with winners of Kaggle competitions and other similar events.

XGBoost is an open source software library providing a gradient boosting framework in most of the commonly used data science, machine learning and software development languages. It has it’s origins back in 2014, but the first official academic publication on the algorithm was published in 2016 by Tianqi Chen and Carlos Guestrin, from the University of Washington.

The algorithm builds upon the previous work on Decision Trees, Bagging, Random Forest, Boosting and Gradient Boosting. The benefits of using these various approaches are well know, researched, developed and proven over many years. XGBoost can be used for the typical use cases of Classification including classification, regression and ranking problems. Check out the original research paper for more details of the inner workings of the algorithm.

Regular machine learning models, like Decision Trees, simply train a single model using a training data set, and only this model is used for predictions. Although a Decision Tree is very simple to create (and very very quick to do so) its predictive power may not be as good as most other algorithms, despite providing model explainability. To overcome this limitation ensemble approaches can be used to create multiple Decision Trees and combines these for predictive purposes. Bagging is an approach where the predictions from multiple DT models are combined using majority voting. Building upon the bagging approach Random Forest uses different subsets of features and subsets of the training data, combining these in different ways to create a collection of DT models and presented as one model to the user. Boosting takes a more iterative approach to refining the models by building sequential models with each subsequent model is focused on minimizing the errors of the previous model. Gradient Boosting uses gradient descent algorithm to minimize errors in subsequent models. Finally with XGBoost builds upon these previous steps enabling parallel processing, tree pruning, missing data treatment, regularization and better cache, memory and hardware optimization. It’s commonly referred to as gradient boosting on steroids.

The following three images illustrates the differences between Decision Trees, Random Forest and XGBoost.

The XGBoost algorithm in Oracle 20c has over 40 different parameter settings, and with most scenarios the default settings with be fine for most scenarios. Only after creating a baseline model with the details will you look to explore making changes to these. Some of the typical settings include:

  • Booster =  gbtree
  • #rounds for boosting = 10
  • max_depth = 6
  • num_parallel_tree = 1
  • eval_metric = Classification error rate  or  RMSE for regression

 

As with most of the Oracle in-database machine learning algorithms, the setup and defining the parameters is really simple. Here is an example of minimum of parameter settings that needs to be defined.

BEGIN
   -- delete previous setttings
   DELETE FROM banking_xgb_settings;

   INSERT INTO BANKING_XGB_SETTINGS (setting_name, setting_value)
   VALUES (dbms_data_mining.algo_name, dbms_data_mining.algo_xgboost);

   -- For 0/1 target, choose binary:logistic as the objective.
   INSERT INTO BANKING_XGB_SETTINGS (setting_name, setting_value)
   VALUES (dbms_data_mining.xgboost_objective, 'binary:logistic);

   commit;
END;

 

To create an XGBoost model run the following.


BEGIN
   DBMS_DATA_MINING.CREATE_MODEL (
      model_name          => 'BANKING_XGB_MODEL',
      mining_function     => dbms_data_mining.classification,
      data_table_name     => 'BANKING_72K',
      case_id_column_name => 'ID',
      target_column_name  => 'TARGET',
      settings_table_name => 'BANKING_XGB_SETTINGS');
END;

That’s all nice and simple, as it should be, and the new model can be called in the same manner as any of the other in-database machine learning models using functions like PREDICTION, PREDICTION_PROBABILITY, etc.

One of the interesting things I found when experimenting with XGBoost was the time it took to create the completed model. Using the default settings the following table gives the time taken, in seconds to create the model.

As you can see it is VERY quick even for large data sets and gives greater predictive accuracy.

 

MSET (Multivariate State Estimation Technique) in Oracle 20c

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Oracle 20c Database comes with some new in-database Machine Learning algorithms.

The short name for one of these is called MSET or Multivariate State Estimation Technique. That’s the simple short name. The more complete name is Multivariate State Estimation Technique – Sequential Probability Ratio Test.  That is a long name, and the reason is it consists of two algorithms. The first part looks at creating a model of the training data, and the second part looks at how new data is statistical different to the training data.

 

What are the use cases for this algorithm?  This algorithm can be used for anomaly detection.

Anomaly Detection, using algorithms, is able identifying unexpected items or events in data that differ to the norm. It can be easy to perform some simple calculations and graphics to examine and present data to see if there are any patterns in the data set. When the data sets grow it is difficult for humans to identify anomalies and we need the help of algorithms.

The images shown here are easy to analyze to spot the anomalies and it can be relatively easy to build some automated processing to identify these. Most of these solutions can be considered AI (Artificial Intelligence) solutions as they mimic human behaviors to identify the anomalies, and these example don’t need deep learning, neural networks or anything like that.

Other types of anomalies can be easily spotted in charts or graphics, such as the chart below.

There are many different algorithms available for anomaly detection, and the Oracle Database already has an algorithm called the One-Class Support Vector Machine. This is a variant of the main Support Vector Machine (SVD) algorithm, which maps or transforms the data, using a Kernel function, into space such that the data belonging to the class values are transformed by different amounts. This creates a Hyperplane between the mapped/transformed values and hopefully gives a large margin between the mapped/transformed points. This is what makes SVD very accurate, although it does have some scaling limitations. For a One-Class SVD, a similar process is followed. The aim is for anomalous data to be mapped differently to common or non-anomalous data, as shown in the following diagram.

 

Getting back to the MSET algorithm. Remember it is a 2-part algorithm abbreviated to MSET. The first part is a non-linear, nonparametric anomaly detection algorithm that calibrates the expected behavior of a system based on historical data from the normal sequence of monitored signals. Using data in time series format (DATE, Value) the training data set contains data consisting of “normal” behavior of the data. The algorithm creates a model to represent this “normal”/stationary data/behavior. The second part of the algorithm compares new or live data and calculates the differences between the estimated and actual signal values (residuals). It uses Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) calculations to determine whether any of the signals have become degraded. As you can imagine the creation of the training data set is vital and may consist of many iterations before determining the optimal training data set to use.

MSET has its origins in computer hardware failures monitoring. Sun Microsystems have been were using it back in the late 1990’s-early 2000’s to monitor and detect for component failures in their servers. Since then MSET has been widely used in power generation plants, airplanes, space travel, Disney uses it for equipment failures, and in more recent times has been extensively used in IOT environments with the anomaly detection focused on signal anomalies.

How does MSET work in Oracle 20c?

An important point to note before we start is, you can use MSET on your typical business data and other data stored in the database. It isn’t just for sensor, IOT, etc data mentioned above and can be used in many different business scenarios.

The first step you need to do is to create the time series data. This can be easily done using a view, but a Very important component is the Time attribute needs to be a DATE format. Additional attributes can be numeric data and these will be used as input to the algorithm for model creation.

-- Create training data set for MSET
CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW mset_train_data
AS SELECT time_id, 
          sum(quantity_sold) quantity,
          sum(amount_sold) amount 
FROM (SELECT * FROM sh.sales WHERE time_id <= '30-DEC-99’)
GROUP BY time_id 
ORDER BY time_id;

The example code above uses the SH schema data, and aggregates the data based on the TIME_ID attribute. This attribute is a DATE data type. The second import part of preparing and formatting the data is Ordering of the data. The ORDER BY is necessary to ensure the data is fed into or processed by the algorithm in the correct time series order.

The next step involves defining the parameters/hyper-parameters for the algorithm. All algorithms come with a set of default values, and in most cases these are suffice for your needs. In that case, you only need to define the Algorithm Name and to turn on Automatic Data Preparation. The following example illustrates this and also includes examples of setting some of the typical parameters for the algorithm.

BEGIN
  DELETE FROM mset_settings;

  -- Select MSET-SPRT as the algorithm
  INSERT  INTO mset_sh_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
  VALUES(dbms_data_mining.algo_name, dbms_data_mining.algo_mset_sprt);

  -- Turn on automatic data preparation
  INSERT INTO mset_sh_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
  VALUES(dbms_data_mining.prep_auto, dbms_data_mining.prep_auto_on);

  -- Set alert count
  INSERT INTO mset_sh_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
  VALUES(dbms_data_mining.MSET_ALERT_COUNT, 3);

  -- Set alert window
  INSERT INTO mset_sh_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
  VALUES(dbms_data_mining.MSET_ALERT_WINDOW, 5);

  -- Set alpha
  INSERT INTO mset_sh_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
  VALUES(dbms_data_mining.MSET_ALPHA_PROB, 0.1);

  COMMIT;
END;

To create the MSET model using the MST_TRAIN_DATA view created above, we can run:

BEGIN
--   DBMS_DATA_MINING.DROP_MODEL(MSET_MODEL');

   DBMS_DATA_MINING.CREATE_MODEL (
      model_name          => 'MSET_MODEL',
      mining_function     => dbms_data_mining.classification,
      data_table_name     => 'MSET_TRAIN_DATA',
      case_id_column_name => 'TIME_ID',
      target_column_name  => '',
      settings_table_name => 'MSET_SETTINGS');
END;

The SELECT statement below is an example of how to call and run the MSET model to label the data to find anomalies. The PREDICTION function will return a values of 0 (zero) or 1 (one) to indicate the predicted values. If the predicted values is 0 (zero) the MSET model has predicted the input record to be anomalous, where as a predicted values of 1 (one) indicates the value is typical. This can be used to filter out the records/data you will want to investigate in more detail.

-- display all dates with Anomalies
SELECT time_id, pred
FROM (SELECT time_id, prediction(mset_sh_model using *) over (ORDER BY time_id) pred 
      FROM mset_test_data)
WHERE pred = 0;

Benchmarking calling Oracle Machine Learning using REST

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Over the past year I’ve been presenting, blogging and sharing my experiences of using REST to expose Oracle Machine Learning models to developers in other languages, for example Python.

One of the questions I’ve been asked is, Does it scale?

Although I’ve used it in several projects to great success, there are no figures I can report publicly on how many REST API calls can be serviced 😦

But this can be easily done, and the results below are based on using and Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse (ADW) on the Oracle Always Free.

The machine learning model is built on a Wine reviews data set, using Oracle Machine Learning Notebook as my tool to write some SQL and PL/SQL to build out a model to predict Good or Bad wines, based on the Prices and other characteristics of the wine. A REST API was built using this model to allow for a developer to pass in wine descriptors and returns two values to indicate if it would be a Good or Bad wine and the probability of this prediction.

No data is stored in the database. I only use the machine learning model to make the prediction

I built out the REST API using APEX, and here is a screenshot of the GET API setup.

Here is an example of some Python code to call the machine learning model to make a prediction.

import json
import requests

country = 'Portugal'
province = 'Douro'
variety = 'Portuguese Red'
price = '30'

resp = requests.get('https://jggnlb6iptk8gum-adw2.adb.us-ashburn-1.oraclecloudapps.com/ords/oml_user/wine/wine_pred/'+country+'/'+province+'/'+'variety'+'/'+price)
json_data = resp.json()
print (json.dumps(json_data, indent=2))

—–

{
  "pred_wine": "LT_90_POINTS",
  "prob_wine": 0.6844716987704507
}

But does this scale, as in how many concurrent users and REST API calls can it handle at the same time.

To test this I multi-threaded processes in Python to call a Python function to call the API, while ensuring a range of values are used for the input parameters. Some additional information for my tests.

  • Each function call included two REST API calls
  • Test effect of creating X processes, at same time
  • Test effect of creating X processes in batches of Y agents
  • Then, the above, with function having one REST API call and also having two REST API calls, to compare timings
  • Test in range of parallel process from 10 to 1,000 (generating up to 2,000 REST API calls at a time)

Some of the results. The table shows the time(*) in seconds to complete the number of processes grouped into batches (agents). My laptop was the limiting factor in these tests. It wasn’t able to test when the number of parallel processes when above 500. That is why I broke them into batches consisting of X agents

* this is the total time to run all the Python code, including the time taken to create each process.

Some observations:

  • Time taken to complete each function/process was between 0.45 seconds and 1.65 seconds, for two API calls.
  • When only one API call, time to complete each function/process was between 0.32 seconds and 1.21 seconds
  • Average time for each function/process was 0.64 seconds for one API functions/processes, and 0.86 for two API calls in function/process
  • Table above illustrates the overhead associated with setting up, calling, and managing these processes

As you can see, even with the limitations of my laptop, using an Oracle Database, in-database machine learning and REST can be used to create a Micro-Service type machine learning scoring engine. Based on these numbers, this machine learning micro-service would be able to handle and process a large number of machine learning scoring in Real-Time, and these numbers would be well within the maximum number of such calls in most applications. I’m sure I could process more parallel processes if I deployed on a different machine to my laptop and maybe used a number of different machines at the same time

How many applications within you enterprise needs to process move than 6,000 real-time machine learning scoring per minute?  This shows us the Oracle Always Free offering is capable and suitable for most applications.

Now, if you are processing more than those numbers per minutes then perhaps you need to move onto the paid options.

What next? I’ll spin up two VMs on Oracle Always Free, install Python, copy code into these VMs and have then run in parallel 🙂

 

OCI Data Science – Create a Project & Notebook, and Explore the Interface

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In my previous blog post I went through the steps of setting up OCI to allow you to access OCI Data Science. Those steps showed the setup and configuration for your Data Science Team.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.46.42

In this post I will walk through the steps necessary to create an OCI Data Science Project and Notebook, and will then Explore the basic Notebook environment.

1 – Create a Project

From the main menu on the Oracle Cloud home page select Data Science -> Projects from the menu.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.07.19

Select the appropriate Compartment in the drop-down list on the left hand side of the screen. In my previous blog post I created a separate Compartment for my Data Science work and team. Then click on the Create Projects button.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.09.11Enter a name for your project. I called this project, ‘DS-Demo-Project’. Click Create button.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.13.44

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.14.44

That’s the Project created.

2 – Create a Notebook

After creating a project (see above) you can not create one or many Notebook Sessions.

To create a Notebook Session click on the Create Notebook Session button (see the above image).  This will create a VM to contain your notebook and associated work. Just like all VM in Oracle Cloud, they come in various different shapes. These can be adjusted at a later time to scale up and then back down based on the work you will be performing.

The following example creates a Notebook Session using the basic VM shape. I call the Notebook ‘DS-Demo-Notebook’. I also set the Block Storage size to 50G, which is the minimum value. The VNC details have been defaulted to those assigned to the Compartment. Click Create button at the bottom of the page.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.22.24

The Notebook Session VM will be created. This might take a few minutes. When created you will see a screen like the following.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.31.21

3 – Open the Notebook

After completing the above steps you can now open the Notebook Session in your browser.  Either click on the Open button (see above image), or copy the link and share with your data science team.

Important: There are a few important considerations when using the Notebooks. While the session is running you will be paying for it, even if the session got terminated at the browser or you lost connect. To manage costs, you may need to stop the Notebook session. More details on this in a later post.

After clicking on the Open button, a new browser tab will open and will ask you to log-in.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.35.26

After logging in you will see your Notebook.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.37.42

4 – Explore the Notebook Environment

The Notebook comes pre-loaded with lots of goodies.

The menu on the left-hand side provides a directory with lots of sample Notebooks, access to the block storage and a sample getting started Notebook.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.41.09

When you are ready to create your own Notebook you can click on the icon for that.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.42.50

Or if you already have a Notebook, created elsewhere, you can load that into your OCI Data Science environment.

Screenshot 2020-02-12 12.44.50

The uploaded Notebook will appear in the list on the left-hand side of the screen.

OCI Data Science – Initial Setup and Configuration

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After a very, very, very long wait (18+ months) Oracle OCI Data Science platform is now available.

But before you jump straight into using OCI Data Science, there is a little bit of setup required for your Cloud Tenancy. There is the easy simple approach and then there is the slightly more involved approach. These are

  • Simple approach. Assuming you are just going to use the root tenancy and compartment, you just need to setup a new policy to enable the use of the OCI Data Science services. This assuming you have your VNC configuration complete with NAT etc. This can be done by creating a policy with the following policy statement. After creating this you can proceed with creating your first notebook in OCI Data Science.
allow service datascience to use virtual-network-family in tenancy

Screenshot 2020-02-11 19.46.38

  • Slightly more complicated approach. When you get into having a team based approach you will need to create some additional Oracle Cloud components to manage them and what resources are allocated to them. This involved creating Compartments, allocating users, VNCs, Policies etc. The following instructions brings you through these steps

IMPORTANT: After creating a Compartment or some of the other things listed below, and they are not displayed in the expected drop-down lists etc, then either refresh your screen or log-out and log back in again!

1. Create a Group for your Data Science Team & Add Users

The first step involves creating a Group to ‘group’ the various users who will be using the OCI Data Science services.

Go to Governance and Administration ->Identity and click on Groups.

Enter some basic descriptive information. I called my Group, ‘my-data-scientists’.

Now click on your Group in the list of Groups and add the users to the group.

You may need to create the accounts for the various users.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 12.03.58

2. Create a Compartment for your Data Science work

Now create a new Compartment to own the network resources and the Data Science resources.

Go to Governance and Administration ->Identity and click on Compartments.

Enter some basic descriptive information. I’ve called my compartment, ‘My-DS-Compartment’.

3. Create Network for your Data Science work

Creating and setting up the VNC can be a little bit of fun. You can do it the manual way whereby you setup and configure everything. Or you can use the wizard to do this. I;m going to show the wizard approach below.

But the first thing you need to do is to select the Compartment the VNC will belong to. Select this from the drop-down list on the left hand side of the Virtual Cloud Network page. If your compartment is not listed, then log-out and log-in!

To use the wizard approach click the Networking QuickStart button.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.15.28

Select the option ‘VCN with Internet Connectivity and click Start Workflow, as you will want to connect to it and to allow the service to connect to other cloud services.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.17.22

I called my VNC ‘My-DS-vnc’ and took the default settings. Then click the Next button.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.19.31

The next screen shows a summary of what will be done. Click the Create button, and all of these networking components will be created.

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.22.39

All done with creating the VNC.

4. Create required Policies enable OCI Data Science for your Compartment

There are three policies needed to allocated the necessary resources to the various components we have just created. To create these go to Governance and Administration ->Identity and click on Policies.

Select your Compartment from the drop-down list. This should be ‘My-DS-Compartment’, then click on Create Policy.

The first policy allocates a group to a compartment for the Data Science services. I called this policy, ‘DS-Manage-Access’.

allow group My-data-scientists to manage data-science-family in compartment My-DS-Compartment

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.30.10

The next policy is to give the Data Science users access to the network resources. I called this policy, ‘DS-Manage-Network’.

allow group My-data-scientists to use virtual-network-family in compartment My-DS-Compartment

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.37.47

And the third policy is to give Data Science service access to the network resources. I called this policy, ‘DS-Network-Access’.

allow service datascience to use virtual-network-family in compartment My-DS-Compartment

Screenshot 2020-02-11 20.41.01

Job Done 🙂

You are now setup to run the OCI Data Science service.  Check out my Blog Post on creating your first OCI Data Science Notebook and exploring what is available in this Notebook.

Data Science (The MIT Press Essential Knowledge series) – available in English, Korean and Chinese

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Back in the middle of 2018 MIT Press published my Data Science book, co-written with John Kelleher. It book was published as part of their Essentials Series.

During the few months it was available in 2018 it became a best seller on Amazon, and one of the top best selling books for MIT Press. This happened again in 2019. Yes, two years running it has been a best seller!

2020 kicks off with the book being translated into Korean and Chinese. Here are the covers of these translated books.

The Japanese and Turkish translations will be available in a few months!

Go get the English version of the book on Amazon in print, Kindle and Audio formats.

https://amzn.to/2qC84KN

This book gives a concise introduction to the emerging field of data science, explaining its evolution, relation to machine learning, current uses, data infrastructure issues and ethical challenge the goal of data science is to improve decision making through the analysis of data. Today data science determines the ads we see online, the books and movies that are recommended to us online, which emails are filtered into our spam folders, even how much we pay for health insurance.

Go check it out.

Amazon.com.          Amazon.co.uk

Screenshot 2020-02-05 11.46.03